United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq


New Career Opportunities in Iraq

By John Lee.

The United Nations has advertised new positions in Iraq:

(Source: UN)

(Picture: Finger pressing a new career start button, from Olivier Le Moal/Shutterstock)

New Career Opportunities in Iraqi Kurdistan

By John Lee.

The United Nations has advertised new positions in Iraqi Kurdistan:

(Source: UN)

(Picture: Success, growth, career, development signpost from 3D_Creation/Shutterstock)

79 Iraqi Civilians Killed in July

A total of 79 Iraqi civilians were killed and another 99 injured in acts of terrorism, violence and armed conflict in Iraq in July 2018*, according to casualty figures recorded by the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI).

The figures include ordinary citizens and others considered civilian at the time of death or injury, such as police in non-combat functions, civil defence, personal security teams, facilities protection police and fire department personnel.

Of the overall figures recorded by UNAMI for the month of July, the number of civilians killed (not including police) was 71, while the number of injured (not including police) was 82.

Baghdad was the worst affected Governorate, with 63 civilian casualties (30 killed, 33 injured), followed by Kirkuk (08 killed, 34 injured) and Ninewa (13 killed and 05 injured).

According to information obtained by UNAMI from the Health Directorate in Anbar, the Governorate suffered a total of 16 civilian casualties (7 killed, 9 injured). Figures are updated until 31 July 2018, inclusive.

*CAVEAT: UNAMI has been hindered in effectively verifying casualties in certain areas; in some cases, UNAMI could only partially verify certain incidents. Figures for casualties from Anbar Governorate are provided by the Health Directorate and might not fully reflect the number of casualties due to the increased volatility of the situation on the ground in Anbar and the disruption of services. For these reasons, the figures reported have to be considered as the absolute minimum.

(Source: United Nations)

New Career Opportunities in Iraq

By John Lee.

The United Nations has advertised new positions in Iraq:

(Source: UN)

(Picture: Finger pressing a new career start button, from Olivier Le Moal/Shutterstock)

New Career Opportunities in Iraqi Kurdistan

By John Lee.

The United Nations has advertised new positions in Iraqi Kurdistan:

(Source: UN)

(Picture: Success, growth, career, development signpost from 3D_Creation/Shutterstock)

76 Iraqi Civilians Killed in May

A total of 76 Iraqi civilians were killed and another 129 injured in acts of terrorism, violence and armed conflict in Iraq in June 2018*, according to casualty figures recorded by the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI).

The figures include ordinary citizens and others considered civilian at the time of death or injury, such as police in non-combat functions, civil defence, personal security teams, facilities protection police and fire department personnel.

Of the overall figures recorded by UNAMI for the month of June, the number of civilians killed (not including police) was 68, while the number of injured (not including police) was 118.

Diyala was the worst affected Governorate, with 52 civilian casualties (16 killed, 36 injured), followed by Kirkuk (10 killed, 36 injured) and Baghdad (19 killed and 18 injured).

According to information obtained by UNAMI from the Health Directorate in Anbar, the Governorate suffered a total of 7 civilian casualties (none killed, 7 injured). Figures are updated until 30 June 2018, inclusive.

*CAVEAT: UNAMI has been hindered in effectively verifying casualties in certain areas; in some cases, UNAMI could only partially verify certain incidents. Figures for casualties from Anbar Governorate are provided by the Health Directorate and might not fully reflect the number of casualties due to the increased volatility of the situation on the ground in Anbar and the disruption of services. For these reasons, the figures reported have to be considered as the absolute minimum.

(Source: United Nations)

New Career Opportunities in Iraq

By John Lee.

The United Nations has advertised new positions in Iraq:

(Source: UN)

(Picture: Finger pressing a new career start button, from Olivier Le Moal/Shutterstock)

New Career Opportunities in Iraqi Kurdistan

By John Lee.

The United Nations has advertised new positions in Iraqi Kurdistan:

(Source: UN)

(Picture: Success, growth, career, development signpost from 3D_Creation/Shutterstock)

UN Security Council extends UNAMI Mandate

The UN Security Council has extended the mandate of the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) by 10 months until 31 May 2019, adopting a streamlined text that would advance the Mission’s role in the Middle East nation’s post‑conflict reconstruction and reconciliation.

Unanimously adopting resolution 2421 (2018), the Council decided that the Special Representative of the Secretary‑General and UNAMI would, at the request of the Government of Iraq, give priority to the provision of advice, support and assistance to the Government and people of Iraq on advancing inclusive political dialogue and national and community‑level reconciliation.

More specifically, by the terms of the resolution, the Special Representative and the Mission would assist the Government and relevant institutions in such areas as electoral processes, constitutional review, and regional dialogue and cooperation on matters including border security, energy, environment, water and refugees.

In coordination with the Government, UNAMID would also — among other things — promote, support and facilitate the coordination and delivery of humanitarian assistance and the safe, orderly and voluntary return of refugees and displaced persons, as well as the coordination and implementation of programmes to improve Iraq’s capacity to provide civil, social and essential services to its people.

Also by the terms of the resolution, the Mission would promote accountability and support the work of the investigative team established by resolution 2379 (2017) to collect, store and preserve evidence in Iraq of acts that could amount to war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide committed by Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant.

Furthermore, it would assist the Government in ensuring the participation, involvement and representation of women at all levels, and participate in efforts to strengthen child protection.

Walter Miller (United States) said the renewal marked the Mission’s first major overhaul since resolution 1770 (2007) was adopted 11 years ago, noting that Council members decided to extend this year’s mandate for a period of 10 months to better align with the United Nations budget cycle.  The document had been trimmed down from seven to two pages of text, although it was important to note the complexity of the challenges UNAMI and Iraq faced moving forward.  He stressed the need to coordinate closely with other United Nations agencies in Iraq to ensure continuity of efforts on humanitarian and development issues on the national and community levels.  The World Bank was doing great work to stabilize Iraq’s financial footing, although more effort was needed on sustainable development, particularly concerning the country’s water issues and the dust storms that plagued the Iraqi people.

Carl Orrenius Skau (Sweden) welcomed the inclusion of an operative women, peace and security component in UNAMI’s mandate, which would allow the Mission to further enhance its efforts to ensure women’s full and meaningful participation in the political process.  Sweden also welcomed the inclusion of a component aimed at strengthening child protection efforts in Iraq, with a focus on the rehabilitation and reintegration of children in UNAMI’s mandate.

The meeting began at 10:02 a.m. and ended at 10:09 a.m.

Resolution

The full text of resolution 2421 (2018) reads as follows:

The Security Council,

Recalling all its previous relevant resolutions on Iraq, in particular 1500 (2003), 1546 (2004), 1557 (2004), 1619 (2005), 1700 (2006), 1770 (2007), 1830 (2008), 1883 (2009), 1936 (2010), 2001 (2011), 2061 (2012), 2110 (2013), 2169 (2014), 2233 (2015), 2299 (2016), 2379 (2017), and reiterating resolution 2107 (2013) on the situation between Iraq and Kuwait, and the values set forth in 2367 (2017),

Reaffirming the independence, sovereignty, unity and territorial integrity of Iraq, and emphasizing the importance of the stability and security of Iraq for the people of Iraq, the region and the international community, particularly in light of Iraq’s victory over the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL, also known as Da’esh),

Supporting Iraq in addressing the challenges it faces as it turns to the task of post‑conflict reconstruction and reconciliation, including the requirement to meet the needs of all Iraqis, including women, youth, children, displaced persons and persons belonging to ethnic and religious minorities,

“1.   Decides to extend the mandate of the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) until 31 May 2019;

“2.   Decides further that the Special Representative of the Secretary‑General and UNAMI, at the request of the Government of Iraq, and taking into account the letter from the Minister for Foreign Affairs of Iraq to the Secretary‑General (document S/2018/430), shall

(a)  prioritize the provision of advice, support and assistance to the Government and people of Iraq on advancing inclusive, political dialogue and national and community‑level reconciliation;

(b)  further advise, support, and assist:

(i) the Government of Iraq and the Independent High Electoral Commission on the development of processes for holding elections and referenda;

(ii) the Government of Iraq and the Council of Representatives on constitutional review, the implementation of constitutional provisions, as well as on the development of processes acceptable to the Government of Iraq to resolve disputed internal boundaries;

(iii) the Government of Iraq on facilitating regional dialogue and cooperation, including on issues of border security, energy, environment, water, and refugees;

(iv) the Government of Iraq with progress on security sector reform efforts, on planning, funding and implementing reintegration programmes for former members of armed groups, where and as appropriate, in coordination with other multinational entities;

(c)  promote, support and facilitate, in coordination with the Government of Iraq:

(i) the coordination and delivery of humanitarian assistance and the safe, orderly and voluntary return, as appropriate, of refugees and displaced persons, including through the efforts of the United Nations country team;

(ii) the coordination and implementation of programmes to improve Iraq’s capacity to provide effective civil, social and essential services for its people and continue active donor coordination of critical reconstruction and assistance programmes;

(iii) Iraqi, World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and other efforts on economic reform, capacity‑building and setting conditions for sustainable development, including through coordination with national and regional organizations and, as appropriate, civil society, donors and other international institutions;

(iv) the contributions of UN agencies, funds, and programmes to the objectives outlined in this resolution under the unified leadership of the Secretary‑General through the Special Representative for Iraq, supported by their designated Deputy;

(d)  promote accountability and the protection of human rights, and judicial and legal reform, in order to strengthen the rule of law in Iraq, in addition to supporting the work of the investigative team established in resolution 2379 (2017);

(e)  approach gender mainstreaming as a cross‑cutting issue throughout its mandate and to advise and assist the Government of Iraq in ensuring the participation, involvement and representation of women at all levels;

(f)  and assist Government of Iraq and United Nations country team efforts to strengthen child protection, including the rehabilitation and reintegration of children;

“3.   Recognizes that security of United Nations personnel is essential for UNAMI to carry out its work for the benefit of the people of Iraq and calls upon the Government of Iraq to continue to provide security and logistical support to the United Nations presence in Iraq;

“4.   Expresses its intention to review the mandate of UNAMI by 31 May 2019 or sooner, if requested by the Government of Iraq;

“5.   Welcomes the results of the independent external assessment of UNAMI as requested by resolution 2367 (2017), its findings and its recommendations, and encourages UNAMI, the Secretariat and United Nations agencies, offices, funds and programs to implement those recommendations;

“6.   Requests the Secretary‑General to report to the Council every three months on the progress made towards the fulfilment of all UNAMI’s responsibilities, including actions taken in response to the independent external assessment;

“7.   Decides to remain seized of the matter.”

(Source: UN)