Syria


Operation Roundup Hits ISIS Remnants in Iraq, Syria

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve and its partners have increased offensive activity against Islamic State of Iraq and Syria targets in designated parts of Iraq and Syria throughout the months of May and June.

Since the May 1 start of Operation Roundup, Syrian Democratic Forces resumed major offensive operations in the Middle Euphrates River Valley. Since then, the SDF has continued to gain ground through offensive operations coupled with precision coalition strike support.

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve and its partner forces continue to exert pressure on ISIS senior leaders and associates in order to degrade, disrupt and dismantle ISIS structures and remove terrorists throughout Iraq and Syria. ISIS morale is sinking on the frontlines as privileged ISIS leaders increasingly abandon their own fighters on the battlefield, taking resources with them as they flee.

Over the coming weeks, Operation Roundup will continue to build momentum against ISIS remnants remaining in the Iraq-Syria border region and the middle Euphrates River Valley. The coalition remains committed to the lasting defeat of ISIS here, increasing peace and stability in the region and protecting all our homelands from the ISIS threat.

Coalition military forces conducted 26 strikes June 11-17, consisting of 36 engagements in Iraq and Syria.

Strikes in Syria

On June 17 near Shadaddi, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets, destroying two ISIS fighting positions.

On June 16 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets, destroying two ISIS supply routes.

On June 15, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS vehicle. Near Shadaddi, two strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit, destroying an ISIS vehicle and an ISIS anti-air artillery system.

On June 14, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, a strike destroyed an ISIS-held building. Near Shadaddi, a strike destroyed an ISIS logistics hub and an ISIS fighting position.

On June 13, coalition military forces conducted seven strikes consisting of seven engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, four strikes destroyed two ISIS vehicles, an ISIS supply route and damaged an ISIS vehicle. Near Shadaddi, three strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit, destroying an ISIS tactical vehicle, an ISIS line of communication and an ISIS headquarters.

On June 12, coalition military forces conducted four strikes consisting of 10 engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit. Near Shadaddi, three strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit, destroying two ISIS fighting positions and three ISIS lines of communication.

On June 11 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets, destroying three ISIS supply routes.

Strikes in Iraq

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on June 15-17.

On June 14, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of four engagements against ISIS targets. Near Basheer, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed seven ISIS-held buildings. Near Rutbah, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on June 13.

On June 12 near Basheer, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets, destroying two ISIS tunnels and an ISIS supply cache.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on June 11.

Definition of Strikes

This coalition strike release contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft, rocket-propelled artillery and ground-based tactical artillery.

A strike, as defined by coalition officials, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single, sometimes cumulative effect in that location. For example, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined.

Task force officials do not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

Operation Roundup Hits ISIS Remnants in Iraq, Syria

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve and its partners have increased offensive activity against Islamic State of Iraq and Syria targets in designated parts of Iraq and Syria throughout the months of May and June.

Since the May 1 start of Operation Roundup, Syrian Democratic Forces resumed major offensive operations in the Middle Euphrates River Valley. Since then, the SDF has continued to gain ground through offensive operations coupled with precision coalition strike support.

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve and its partner forces continue to exert pressure on ISIS senior leaders and associates in order to degrade, disrupt and dismantle ISIS structures and remove terrorists throughout Iraq and Syria. ISIS morale is sinking on the frontlines as privileged ISIS leaders increasingly abandon their own fighters on the battlefield, taking resources with them as they flee.

Over the coming weeks, Operation Roundup will continue to build momentum against ISIS remnants remaining in the Iraq-Syria border region and the middle Euphrates River Valley. The coalition remains committed to the lasting defeat of ISIS here, increasing peace and stability in the region and protecting all our homelands from the ISIS threat.

Coalition military forces conducted 26 strikes June 11-17, consisting of 36 engagements in Iraq and Syria.

Strikes in Syria

On June 17 near Shadaddi, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets, destroying two ISIS fighting positions.

On June 16 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets, destroying two ISIS supply routes.

On June 15, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS vehicle. Near Shadaddi, two strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit, destroying an ISIS vehicle and an ISIS anti-air artillery system.

On June 14, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, a strike destroyed an ISIS-held building. Near Shadaddi, a strike destroyed an ISIS logistics hub and an ISIS fighting position.

On June 13, coalition military forces conducted seven strikes consisting of seven engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, four strikes destroyed two ISIS vehicles, an ISIS supply route and damaged an ISIS vehicle. Near Shadaddi, three strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit, destroying an ISIS tactical vehicle, an ISIS line of communication and an ISIS headquarters.

On June 12, coalition military forces conducted four strikes consisting of 10 engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit. Near Shadaddi, three strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit, destroying two ISIS fighting positions and three ISIS lines of communication.

On June 11 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets, destroying three ISIS supply routes.

Strikes in Iraq

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on June 15-17.

On June 14, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of four engagements against ISIS targets. Near Basheer, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed seven ISIS-held buildings. Near Rutbah, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on June 13.

On June 12 near Basheer, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets, destroying two ISIS tunnels and an ISIS supply cache.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on June 11.

Definition of Strikes

This coalition strike release contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft, rocket-propelled artillery and ground-based tactical artillery.

A strike, as defined by coalition officials, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single, sometimes cumulative effect in that location. For example, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined.

Task force officials do not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

Multi-Billion Dollars Needed to Keep Water Flowing

This article was originally published by Niqash. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

By Ibrahim Saleh.

Multi-Billion Dollar Budget Needed To Keep Iraq’s Water Flowing

In Baghdad, locals have been fretting about dramatic falls in the level of the Tigris river. The government has a plan. Only problem is, that plan requires billions in funding that Iraq does not have.

The passengers in the small bus all peer out anxiously as the vehicle crosses the Sanak bridge – the name used by locals for the Rashid bridge which spans the Tigris river in the middle of Baghdad. They’re not worried about the bridge though, they’re worried about the water levels.

“It’s actually very low,” one passenger says to another.

“We should expect that,” his travelling companion replies, “they are trying to drain the water – and the life – out of Iraq.”

Salah al-Jibouri is the 47-year old driver of the minibus. The passengers call him Uncle Salah. And he’s been driving this route for years. At the beginning of every Iraqi summer, he always hears these same conversations about the amount of water in the Tigris river. But this time, he says resignedly, it’s more serious and people are really worried.

Possibly with good reason. At the time the bus is crossing the bridge, it had only been 24 hours since the Turkish government announced that they had started filling their huge Ilisu Dam to the north. Critics have been talking about the damage that stopping the flow of water in Turkey will do to Iraq for years – but now the problem is clear for all to see, as the Tigris river levels have fallen away dramatically.

Locals could talk about little else. Some Iraqis posted pictures of residents who had been able to walk across the river, which usually requires a boat or a bridge to get over. They were also upset with their own government, which seemed to be confused as to what exactly was going on.

Turkish authorities quickly moved to calm the situation with the Turkish ambassador to Iraq saying that it would take nearly a  year to fill the Ilisu dam’s reservoir and the Turkish president Tayyip Erdogan announcing that the filling of the dam had been postponed.

The Iraqi minister for water resources, Hassan al-Janabi, said that the two countries had agreed upon a way for Turkey to fill the dam more slowly, and without stopping as much water flowing into Iraq.

But the problem is far from resolved. Baghdad locals used to worry about flooding in the city during the wetter months. But now, floods are the last thing they need fear. Instead it is the dams being built by neighbouring countries – including Turkey, Iran and Syria – as well as climate change, that are reducing the water flow into their city.

Over two-thirds of Iraq’s water comes from tributaries it shares with neighbouring countries.

“After these dams were built, Iraq’s share of water decreased by more than 45 percent,” says Zafer Abdullah, a consultant for Iraq’s ministry of water resources.

Iraq has agreements with its neighbours about water flow and how much water the different nations need to share. But some of the treaties are not being adhered to, with, for example, the Iranian government reporting that it cannot stick to a previous deal because climate change has decreased the amount of water to be shared.

The solution would not be to build more dams, the Iraqi ministry of water resources, has stated. Iraq’s own dams are underutilized and would store billions more cubic litres, if they could.

The Iraqi authorities say they have a strategy to see them through until 2035, that would provide water for things like drinking and agriculture. It takes into account the decreased amount of water due to climate change as well as the potential for neighbouring countries to keep blocking or diverting rivers.

However, as al-Janabi says, for the plan to work, it requires 24 “urgent and essential” points to be resolved, at the cost of up to US$3 billion. And that is extra funding the Iraqi national budget cannot afford right now.

(Picture credit: Mohammad Huzam)

Syria, Iraq Consider Re-Opening Border

By John Lee.

Iraq and Syria are said to be considering the possibility of reopening their border for the first time in several years.

Syrian Arab News Agency (SANA) reported that Syria’s Deputy Prime Minister Walid al-Moallem sent a letter to his Iraqi counterpart Ibrahim al-Jaafari hoping to increase efforts to reopen the border crossing connectinga the Syrian city of Albukamal and the Iraqi city of Al-Qa’im [Qaim].

(Source: AINA)

Operation Roundup Targets ISIS Remnants in Iraq, Syria

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve and its partners have increased offensive activity against Islamic State of Iraq and Syria targets in designated parts of Iraq and Syria throughout the month of May.

Since the May 1 start of Operation Roundup, Syrian Democratic Forces resumed major offensive operations in the middle Euphrates River Valley. Since then, the SDF has continued to gain ground through offensive operations, coupled with precision coalition strike support.

During the month of May, the coalition has conducted 225 strikes with 280 engagements. This demonstrates a 304 percent increase over the 74 strikes conducted in March, and a 123 percent increase over the 183 strikes recorded in April 2018.

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve and its partner forces continue to exert pressure on ISIS senior leaders and associates in order to degrade, disrupt and dismantle ISIS structures and remove terrorists throughout Iraq and Syria. ISIS morale is sinking on the frontlines as privileged ISIS leaders increasingly abandon their own fighters on the battlefield, taking resources with them as they flee.

Over the coming weeks, Operation Roundup will continue to build momentum against ISIS remnants remaining in the Iraq-Syria border region and the middle Euphrates River Valley. The coalition remains committed to the lasting defeat of ISIS, increasing peace and stability in the region and protecting all from the ISIS threat.

Coalition military forces conducted 134 strikes June 1-10, consisting of 161 engagements in Iraq and Syria:

Strikes in Syria

On June 10, coalition military forces conducted six strikes consisting of six engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, four strikes destroyed four ISIS supply routes. Near Shadaddi, two strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS logistics hub.

On June 9, coalition military forces conducted 14 strikes consisting of 16 engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, six strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS vehicle, an ISIS fighting position, an ISIS supply route and two ISIS-held buildings. Eight strikes conducted near Shadaddi engaged an ISIS tactical unit, destroying an ISIS fighting position, an ISIS logistics hub, an ISIS tactical vehicle and an ISIS weapon.

On June 8, coalition military forces conducted nine strikes consisting of 11 engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, six strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS watercraft. Near Shadaddi, three strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed two ISIS command-and-control centers, an ISIS supply cache and an ISIS supply route.

On June 7, coalition military forces conducted 12 strikes consisting of 12 engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, nine strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS supply route, two ISIS-held buildings and an ISIS watercraft. Three strikes near Shadaddi destroyed two ISIS supply routes and an ISIS communication line.

On June 6, coalition military forces conducted 17 strikes consisting of 19 engagements against ISIS targets. Eleven strikes near Abu Kamal engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed two ISIS vehicles. Near Shadaddi, six strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS vehicle, an ISIS fighting position, two ISIS logistics hubs and an ISIS supply route.

On June 5, coalition military forces conducted 12 strikes consisting of 13 engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, seven strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit. Near Shadaddi, five strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS vehicle-borne improvised explosive device, three ISIS fighting positions and two ISIS vehicles.

On June 4, coalition military forces conducted 17 strikes consisting of 20 engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, 15 strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed two ISIS fighting positions, an ISIS tactical vehicle, six ISIS vehicles and an ISIS command-and-control center. Near Shadaddi, two strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS logistics hub and an ISIS heavy machine gun.

On June 3, coalition military forces conducted 28 strikes consisting of 42 engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, 22 strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS fighting position, an ISIS logistics hub, four ISIS vehicles and an ISIS communication line. Near Shadaddi, six strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS vehicle-borne IED, an ISIS vehicle, an ISIS command-and-control center and 11 ISIS fighting positions.

On June 2, coalition military forces conducted eight strikes consisting of 11 engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, six strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed two ISIS fighting positions and two ISIS command-and-control centers. Near Shadaddi, two strikes destroyed 15 ISIS-held buildings.

On June 1, coalition military forces conducted nine strikes consisting of nine engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, four strikes destroyed an ISIS tunnel and an ISIS held-building. Near Shadaddi, five strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed three ISIS command-and-control centers and five ISIS-held buildings.

Strikes in Iraq

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on June 10.

On June 9 near Mosul, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of an engagement against ISIS targets, destroying five ISIS tunnels.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on June 3-8.

On June 2 near Tal Afar, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of an engagement against ISIS targets, destroying an ISIS-held building, an ISIS bunker and an ISIS supply cache.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on June 1.

Definition of Strikes

The coalition’s strike report contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft, rocket propelled artillery and ground-based tactical artillery.

A strike, as defined by coalition officials, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single, sometimes cumulative effect in that location. For example, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined.

Task force officials do not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

Coalition Trainers in Iraq Helping ‘Make a Good Force Better’

Coalition Trainers in Iraq Helping ‘Make a Good Force Better’

The coalition training effort in Iraq is all about “making a good force better,” said Italian army Brig. Gen. Roberto Vannacci, the deputy commanding general for training for Operation Inherent Resolve’s Joint Forces Land Component Command in Iraq.

Iraqi security forces continue to press the fight against the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria by rooting out and destroying pockets of ISIS terrorists in the country. From the nadir when ISIS was knocking on the gates of Baghdad, Iraqi forces have taken on the terror group and liberated almost all of the territory the group once held.

The trainers of the coalition’s Operation Inherent Resolve gave Iraqi security forces the training they needed to expel the violent extremist group, Vannacci said during a video teleconference from Baghdad to reporters in the Pentagon.

“By all measures, the Iraqi security forces have already proven that they are more than ready and capable of securing the country,” Vannacci said. “On May the 12th, Iraq’s first national election since the rise of ISIS was held peacefully despite repeated warnings from ISIS of their intent to use violence to discourage Iraqis from voting. This is mostly thanks to the training and preparations conducted by Iraqi security forces to ensure that all Iraqis were able to exercise their right to vote free from fear of harm.”

Vannacci said the coalition continues the mission to train and equip Iraqi security forces, to ensure the lasting defeat of ISIS, and to set the conditions for full-on stabilization efforts.

“To date, more than 150,000 Iraqi security forces have been trained across multiple locations in Iraq,” the general said.

That training runs the gamut from full-on combat to policing to stabilization, he said.

Demining, Lifesaver Training

In addition to basic combat skills, the coalition trainers have also stressed demining operations and combat lifesaver training. “In Western Baghdad, more than 25,000 police and border guard personnel have been trained in law enforcement and border security procedures,” Vannacci said.

And, more than 18,000 members of Iraq’s elite counterterrorism force received coalition training, the general said.

The coalition also trains and equips the Iraqi air force, Vannacci said. This, he said, includes training Iraqis to fly and maintain their aircraft.

Training the Iraqi forces is a multinational effort, the general said. “Australian forces in Taji and Spanish forces in Bismayah are training ground troops,” Vannacci said. “In the Kurdish region and in western Baghdad, Italian personnel are training army and police forces. Also, German forces are providing training in the Kurdish region while Danish forces are leading the training in Al Asad Air Base.”

The coalition has also provided Iraqi forces with more than $2 billion in equipment, the general said.

Providing Equipment

“Seventeen Iraqi army brigades have been provided with initial equipment sets, including personal equipment, small arms, ammunition, around 1,000 nontactical vehicles and over 1,100 armored vehicles,” Vannacci said.

Efforts to train police and border guards continue apace with the coalition providing additional equipment to around 20 federal police and border force brigades, including provisioning more than 180 prefabricated, border guard and police presence infrastructure since the beginning of 2018, he said.

The coalition has also provided more than 400 explosive detection and demining kits to assist in the detection and removal of improvised explosive devices, Vannacci said.

Iraqi security forces have shown their worth as part of the coalition by conducting strikes in Syria, where they targeted ISIS activity designed to export violence, the general said.

“The hard-fought victories in Ramadi, Mosul and Tel Afar prove that the Iraqi security forces have always been capable of fighting for the freedom of all Iraqis,” Vannacci said. “The coalition’s goal is simply to make a good force better and to enhance to capability of the Iraqi security forces to ensure Iraq’s lasting peace and security. By all measures, they are well on their way.”

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

Coalition Strikes Hit ISIS Terrorists in Syria, Iraq

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve and its partners continued to strike Islamic State of Iraq and Syria targets in designated parts of Syria and Iraq between May 4-10, conducting 53 strikes consisting of 63 engagements, Combined task force officials reported on Friday.

Strikes in Syria

  • On May 10, coalition military forces conducted four strikes consisting of four engagements against ISIS targets. Three took place near Abu Kamal. Near Dayr Az Zawr, a strike destroyed an ISIS artillery piece.
  • On May 9, coalition military forces conducted four strikes consisting of four engagements against ISIS targets. Two took place near Abu Kamal. Near Shadaddi, a strike destroyed an ISIS vehicle-borne improvised explosive device factory. Near Dayr Az Zawr, a strike destroyed an ISIS IED belt.
  • On May 8, coalition military forces conducted five strikes consisting of five engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, four strikes destroyed three ISIS VBIED factories. Near Shadaddi, a strike destroyed an ISIS VBIED factory.
  • On May 7 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted six strikes consisting of six engagements against ISIS targets, engaging an ISIS tactical unit.
  • On May 6, coalition military forces conducted eight strikes consisting of 13 engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, five strikes engaged one ISIS tactical unit, destroying an ISIS staging area, a supply route, an ISIS-held building and a command-and-control center. Near Shadaddi, three strikes destroyed an ISIS fighting position, a mortar position and two VBIED factories.
  • On May 5, coalition military forces conducted 12 strikes consisting of 12 engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, 10 strikes destroyed two ISIS weapons caches and a logistics hub. Near Shadaddi, two strikes destroyed a vehicle and an ISIS security post.
  • On May 4 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted seven strikes consisting of seven engagements against ISIS targets, destroying an ISIS supply cache, a supply route, two IED factories and an ISIS vehicle storage facility.

Strikes in Iraq

  • On May 9 near Rutbah, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of six engagements against ISIS targets, destroying two buildings and a vehicle.
  • On May 7 near Kisik, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of one engagement against ISIS targets, destroying three ISIS tunnels and a weapons cache.
  • On May 5, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets.  Near Mosul, two strikes destroyed seven ISIS tunnel systems. Near Makhmur, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS cave.
  • On May 4 near Hawayjah, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets, destroying an ISIS vehicle.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

These strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The destruction of ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria also further limits the group’s ability to project terror and conduct external operations throughout the region and the rest of the world, task force officials said.

The list above contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft; rocket-propelled artillery; and ground-based tactical artillery, officials noted.

A strike, as defined by the coalition, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single or cumulative effect.

For example, task force officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined, officials said.

The task force does not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

US Closes Ground Ops Command in Iraq

The Combined Joint Forces Land Component Command headquarters was deactivated today at a ceremony in Baghdad, signifying the end of major combat operations in Iraq against the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria and acknowledging the changing composition and responsibilities of the coalition.

CJFLCC was responsible for coalition land force operations in support of Iraqi security forces during the campaign to defeat ISIS in Iraq and liberate more than 4.5 million Iraqis subject to ISIS’ brutal control.

Iraqi and coalition leaders attended the ceremony that formally transferred CJFLCC’s command authorities to Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve and featured a traditional casing of the colors ceremony.

“Casing the CJFLCC colors is a symbolic gesture, honoring the perseverance and sacrifice of our coalition partners,” said Army Maj. Gen. Walter Piatt, the former commander of CJFLCC. “Thanks to our partnered success, we are able to continue our support to the government of Iraq under the unified command of CJTF-OIR.”

Iraqi Brig. Gen. Yahya Rasool Abdullah, spokesman for Iraqi security forces, said CJFLCC has been an integral part of Iraq’s success against ISIS.

“The commitment and professionalism of all the men and women from all the coalition nations has been of the highest order, and Iraq is immensely grateful for their sacrifice and dedication in this task,” he said. “We look forward to taking the partnership forward with the Combined Joint Task Force, and a friendship that will endure for years to come.”

With the deactivation of CJFLCC, its train, advise, assist and equip missions in support of Iraqi forces are now consolidated under a single headquarters, reflecting the coalition’s commitment to eliminate unnecessary command structures as the nature of its support to Iraq evolves from supporting and enabling combat operations to the training and development of self-sufficient Iraqi security-related capabilities.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)