Security


New Report: Iraqi Security Forces, Popular Mobilization Forces

By John Lee.

The Institute for the Study of War has issued a new report — Iraqi Security Forces and Popular Mobilization Forces: Orders of Battle — in which it claimes that the liberation Daesh’s urban holdings in Iraq was necessary but not sufficient to secure America’s vital national interests.

It says ISIS has lost neither the will nor the capability to fight, even as it withdraws into desert hideouts and sleeper cell formations in November 2017.

Rather, dispersed ISIS militants have begun an insurgent campaign in northern and western Iraq as some of its foreign fighters have returned to their home countries to serve in ISIS’s external operations network.

The report includes considerable detail on the various players and agencies involved in security in Iraq.

Click here to download the full report.

(Source: Institute for the Study of War)

Inherent Resolve Strikes Target ISIS in Syria, Iraq

U.S. and coalition military forces continued to attack the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria over the last three days, conducting 14 strikes consisting of 27 engagements, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported yesterday.

Officials reported details of the most recent strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Strikes in Syria

On Dec. 8 in Syria, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed a tactical vehicle and a fighting position.

On Dec. 9 in Syria, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of five engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Abu Kamal, two strikes engaged two ISIS tactical units and destroyed an ISIS vehicle and an ISIS line of communication.
  • Near Shadaddi, a strike engaged an ISIS mortar team.

On Dec. 10 in Syria, coalition military forces conducted eight strikes consisting of 13 engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes engaged eight ISIS tactical units and destroyed two fighting positions, a mortar system, a tactical vehicle and an ISIS headquarters.

Strike in Iraq

On Dec. 9 in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of six engagements against ISIS targets near Tuz. The strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS truck.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

These strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The destruction of ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria also further limits the group’s ability to project terror and conduct external operations throughout the region and the rest of the world, task force officials said.

The list above contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft; rocket-propelled artillery; and some ground-based tactical artillery when fired on planned targets, officials noted.

Ground-based artillery fired in counterfire or in fire support to maneuver roles is not classified as a strike, they added. A strike, as defined by the coalition, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single or cumulative effect.

For example, task force officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined, officials said.

The task force does not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

Iraqi Airspace Flight Restrictions Relaxed

By John Lee.

The United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has reduced its flight restrictions in Iraqi airspace, though some restrictions will remain in place.

It had previously prohibited all US civilian flight operations over the country due to risks relating to the armed conflict with the Islamic State group.

Rudaw quotes a statement from Baghdad International Airport as saying that the announcement “means that global airlines can go over Iraqi airspace wherever they want.

The FAA statement can be viewed here.

(Sources: Govdelivery, Rudaw)

PM announces Defeat of Daesh

By John Lee.

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi has declared “the ending of entire clearance of the Aljazeera in Nineveh and Anbar completely, and we have full control along the Iraqi-Syrian … Border.

Al-Abadi has said that the victories were achieved by unity and determination. “The enemy wanted to destroy our country and civilization and we have countered and defeated it.

The Special Representative of the Secretary-General (SRSG) for Iraq, Mr. Ján Kubiš, congratulated Iraq on the complete liberation of all of its territory from the Daesh terrorists:

“On this day, we remember all those who paid the ultimate price. Our thoughts are with the families of the martyrs and fighters from all around the country that stepped forward to save their country, and with the millions who have been displaced and are eagerly waiting to return to their homes to rebuild their lives.”

(Sources: Office of the Iraqi Prime Minister, UN)

PM announces Defeat of Daesh

By John Lee.

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi has declared “the ending of entire clearance of the Aljazeera in Nineveh and Anbar completely, and we have full control along the Iraqi-Syrian … Border.

Al-Abadi has said that the victories were achieved by unity and determination. “The enemy wanted to destroy our country and civilization and we have countered and defeated it.

The Special Representative of the Secretary-General (SRSG) for Iraq, Mr. Ján Kubiš, congratulated Iraq on the complete liberation of all of its territory from the Daesh terrorists:

“On this day, we remember all those who paid the ultimate price. Our thoughts are with the families of the martyrs and fighters from all around the country that stepped forward to save their country, and with the millions who have been displaced and are eagerly waiting to return to their homes to rebuild their lives.”

(Sources: Office of the Iraqi Prime Minister, UN)

Video: Has ISIL been Defeated in Iraq?

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

In 2014, ISIL announced it was taking over nearly all of Iraq and Syria.

But three years later and billions lost, Iraq’s Prime Minister Haider Al Abadi says his military has defeated the armed group.

It’s been a long road to get to this point. The battle for Mosul alone took months. Almost a million people had to flee, and thousands left behind were killed.

More than eight thousand homes were reportedly destroyed. And that was just one of several Iraqi cities once controlled by ISIL.

What does this mean for Iraq’s future?

Presenter:

  • Sami Zeidan

Guests:

  • Ali Al Dabbagh – Former Spokesman for the Iraqi Government
  • Tallha Abdulrazaq – Researcher at the University of Exeter’s Strategy and Security Institute
  • Ahmed Rushdi – Adviser to the Speaker of the Iraqi Parliament

Video: Has ISIL been Defeated in Iraq?

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

In 2014, ISIL announced it was taking over nearly all of Iraq and Syria.

But three years later and billions lost, Iraq’s Prime Minister Haider Al Abadi says his military has defeated the armed group.

It’s been a long road to get to this point. The battle for Mosul alone took months. Almost a million people had to flee, and thousands left behind were killed.

More than eight thousand homes were reportedly destroyed. And that was just one of several Iraqi cities once controlled by ISIL.

What does this mean for Iraq’s future?

Presenter:

  • Sami Zeidan

Guests:

  • Ali Al Dabbagh – Former Spokesman for the Iraqi Government
  • Tallha Abdulrazaq – Researcher at the University of Exeter’s Strategy and Security Institute
  • Ahmed Rushdi – Adviser to the Speaker of the Iraqi Parliament

GardaWorld Weekly Security Report

GardaWorld, a global leader in comprehensive security and risk management, has made its weekly security report available to Iraq Business News readers.

Prepared by GardaWorld’s Risk Analysis Team in Iraq, this essential report includes short- and medium-term outlooks on the security situation, reports and commentary on recent significant events, and a detailed overview of developments across the country.

Please click here to download the latest report free of charge.

For more information on how GardaWorld’s services can support your business in Iraq, please contact Daniel Matthews, Senior Director Iraq, at daniel.matthews@garda.com

Nightclubs, Cafes still Risky Business for Iraqi Women

By Adnan Abu Zeed for Al Monitor. Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News. 

The Iraqi parliament’s Committee on Women, Family and Childhood revealed Nov. 13 that there are organized criminals behind the work of some female minors in cafes and casinos. The committee said this phenomenon is no different from that of human trafficking.

The next day, an Iraqi radio station reported the story of a 17-year-old girl who works at a nightclub in Baghdad. “I have to work because I need money” to support herself and her mother, she said. “The owner of the club raped me more than once.” She also said she is subjected to beatings almost daily.

Another girl, however, told Al-Monitor on condition of anonymity that some cafes and nightclubs operate aboveboard and provide desperately needed employment opportunities for young women. “I managed to work at a relative’s [place] because I needed money and the casino owner agreed to temporarily hire me for humanitarian reasons.”

Regardless of the situation, in conservative societies such as Iraq’s, girls and women who work at casinos, nightclubs and even coffee shops are often frowned upon.

Also, as women rarely get involved in this field of work, when they do it often draws media interest. One example is a woman from Nasiriyah who decided Jan. 20 to open a family coffee shop, the first of its kind in the south. The opening was widely covered by local media. Yet while this woman showed courage to embark on a nontraditional career path, other women have faced obstacles. On April 27, the Wasit Governorate Council voted by a majority to ban girls from working in cafes.

The Child Labourers of Baghdad

This article was originally published by Niqash. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Child labour is illegal in Iraq. But if there is death or disease in the family, minors are often forced to work. The authorities responsible for policing labour laws take a range of different attitudes to that.

Just a few days after the beginning of the new school term in Baghdad and Mohammed Ali dropped out. He is 12. His father was killed in a bombing in the city a few months ago and now as the eldest of three sons he feels adult responsibility weighing heavily upon him.

“I just had to search for a job, any job, in order to bring food to my brothers and to my mother who is taking care of them,” says Ali, who NIQASH met on the street. “I will never let her go out to search for a job as long as I am there for her.”

Ali is sweating and he wears ragged clothing. He works as a porter and carries building materials, rocks and other heavy items around the city. He leaves home at sunrise and returns at sunset, eats just one meal a day that costs him about IQD1,000 (US$0.83) and gives the rest of his daily wages, IQD15,000 (around US$12) to his mother for housekeeping. He makes sure that his younger brothers are doing all right and he sleeps next to them in the same bed before getting up the next day to go out and do the same all over again.

Ali is just one of many underage labourers in Iraq. The number of child workers has increased significantly since 2003. Last year the United Nations children’s’ agency, UNICEF, said that more than half a million Iraqi children are thought to be working rather than at school. A lot of those cases are due to violence or displacement, as in Ali’s situation. Iraq’s own Ministry of Planning has higher numbers, saying that about one in five children, aged mostly between five and 14, work to support their families and themselves.