ISIS


Military Strikes Continue Against ISIS Terrorists in Syria, Iraq

U.S. and coalition military forces continued to attack the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, conducting 10 strikes consisting of 14 engagements Nov. 10-23, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported yesterday.

Officials reported details of the strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Strikes in Syria

Yesterday near Abu Kamal in Syria, coalition military forces conducted a strike that engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS vehicle consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Syria on Nov. 22.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Syria on Nov. 21.

On Nov. 20 near Abu Kamal in Syria, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of an engagement that destroyed an ISIS vehicle.

On Nov. 19 near Abu Kamal, two strikes consisting of two engagements damaged four ISIS tunnel systems.

Strikes in Iraq

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq yesterday.

On Nov. 22 near Qayyarah in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of two engagements that destroyed an ISIS headquarters and a vehicle-borne bomb factory.

On Nov. 21 in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted six strikes consisting of nine engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Qaim, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS vehicle.
  • Near Qayyarah, two strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS air defense headquarters, a fighting position and 22 ISIS-held buildings.
  • Near Rawah, three strikes destroyed two ISIS tunnels, two weapons caches and an ISIS bunker.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on Nov. 20.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

These strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The destruction of ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria also further limits the group’s ability to project terror and conduct external operations throughout the region and the rest of the world, task force officials said.

The list above contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft; rocket-propelled artillery; and some ground-based tactical artillery when fired on planned targets, officials noted.

Ground-based artillery fired in counterfire or in fire support to maneuver roles is not classified as a strike, they added. A strike, as defined by the coalition, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single or cumulative effect.

For example, task force officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined, officials said.

The task force does not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

UN: Daesh “Down but Not Out” in Iraq

ISIL ‘down but not out’ in Iraq; UN envoy urges efforts to defeat group’s extremist ideology

The military victory against the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL/Da’esh) is only one component of a complex battle that addresses the root causes of extremist ideology, the United Nations envoy for Iraq said Wednesday.

“Da’esh remains able and determined to continue devastating random attacks against the Iraqi civilian population, against civilians globally,” Ján Kubiš, the Secretary-General’s Special Representative and Head of the UN Assistance Mission in Iraq (UNAMI), told the Security Council.

“Da’esh is down but not yet out even in Iraq,” he stressed, adding that “only by defeating its loathsome ‘takfiri’ ideology, choking off its external support, and addressing the causes that prompted so many Iraqis to join or tolerate Da’esh can this terrorist organization finally be eliminated.”

He noted that on 17 November, the Iraqi Security Forces (ISF) fully recaptured Rawa, the last remaining densely settled area under Da’esh control in Iraq. Since summer 2014, Da’esh has lost 95 per cent of the territory it once controlled in Iraq and Syria and more than 7.5 million people have been liberated from its grasp.

But “this victory has come at a very high cost,” said Mr. Kubiš, noting that thousands of fighters and civilians were killed or wounded, hundreds of thousands of children brainwashed, entire cities in ruins, and some six million people have been displaced.

Further, Da’esh has exterminated or enslaved thousands of Muslims, as well as minority communities, particularly women and girls, in action amounting to war crimes and crimes against humanity, perhaps even genocide.

Mr. Kubiš encouraged the global coalition against Da’esh to continue both military and non military efforts to help Iraq ensure the lasting and sustainable defeat of Da’esh.

Last IS-held Iraqi Town Retaken

By Shelly Kittleson for Al Monitor. Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News. 

After a week of long hauls through threatening desert terrain and villages to take up positions, Iraqi troops and local fighters on Nov. 17 captured Rawa, the last urban bastion held by the Islamic State (IS) in Iraq.

The operation to retake the city and the surrounding area had officially begun on Nov. 11 as part of the fight to recapture all of western Anbar province. The fighting got underway in September, after an initial push in January enabled preparations close to the major cities still under IS control at that time along the Euphrates.

Scores of tanks and armored vehicles, backed by international coalition airstrikes, approached the city on Nov. 14 via a circuitous route from the Jazeera Operations Command in Haditha and the Al-Asad air base in the town of Baghdadi.

The journey required several hours of driving westwards on heavily damaged roads to the border town of Qaim, captured a week before, prior to crossing the Euphrates and essentially making a U-turn and heading back toward the east.

The 7th and 8th Divisions of the Iraqi army and local Popular Mobilization Units (PMU) trained by the international coalition were forced to traverse the only bridge in the area left usable for crossing the Euphrates, after years of airstrikes and destruction by IS, and then move toward the city via lengthy desert tracts and low-lying areas near the river.

Only shortly before the final push began was a pontoon bridge installed across the Euphrates close to the city to facilitate movement from the southern bank.

Improvised explosive devices constituted a major threat en route, as evinced by signs of recent explosions along the road to the front, plumes of smoke arising from controlled detonations and the death of one member of a PMU militia’s media team on Nov. 16. Casualty figures for Iraqi forces are not released as a matter of government policy, so it is not known how many troops were lost to the devices.

Details of Latest Strikes Against ISIS

U.S. and coalition military forces continued to attack the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, conducting 16 strikes consisting of 29 engagements Nov. 17-19, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Officials reported details of the strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

There were no reported strikes conducted on Nov. 19 in Iraq or Syria.

Strikes in Syria

On Nov. 18 in Syria, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Abu Kamal, two strikes engaged two ISIS tactical units and destroyed three ISIS vehicles.
  • Near Dayr Az Zawr, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit.

On Nov. 17 in Syria, coalition military forces conducted four strikes consisting of five engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Abu Kamal, three strikes engaged two ISIS tactical units and destroyed a vehicle-borne improvised explosive device, a tactical vehicle and an ISIS construction vehicle.
  • Near Dayr Az Zawr, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit.

Strikes in Iraq

On Nov. 18 in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted five strikes consisting of 17 engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Beiji, two strikes destroyed two ISIS tunnels.
  • Near Rawah, two strikes facilitated effective harassing fire on ISIS targets.
  • Near Qayyarah, one strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed 14 ISIS-held buildings and an ISIS vehicle.

On Nov. 17 in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted four strikes consisting of four engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Beiji, a strike destroyed an ISIS-held building and a fighting position.
  • Near Rawah, a strike destroyed an IED factory.
  • Near Qayyarah, two strikes engaged two ISIS tactical units and destroyed an ISIS weapons cache.

Previous Strikes

Officials also provided details today on 17 earlier strikes and 17 engagements against ISIS in Syria and Iraq for which the information was not previously available:

  • On July 30, near Raqqa, Syria, three strikes damaged three ISIS fighting positions.
  • On July 31, near Raqqa, Syria, three strikes damaged three ISIS fighting positions.
  • On Nov. 16, near Al Qaim, Iraq, three strikes facilitated effective harassing fire on ISIS targets.
  • On Nov. 16, near Rawah, Iraq, seven strikes destroyed five ISIS supply routes and facilitated effective harassing fire on ISIS targets.
  • On July 17, near Qara Tapa, Iraq, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed two weapons caches and an ISIS tunnel.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

These strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The destruction of ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria also further limits the group’s ability to project terror and conduct external operations throughout the region and the rest of the world, task force officials said.

The list above contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft; rocket-propelled artillery; and some ground-based tactical artillery when fired on planned targets, officials noted.

Ground-based artillery fired in counterfire or in fire support to maneuver roles is not classified as a strike, they added. A strike, as defined by the coalition, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single or cumulative effect.

For example, task force officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined, officials said.

The task force does not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

Strikes Continue Against ISIS Terrorists in Syria, Iraq

U.S. and coalition military forces continued to attack the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, conducting 34 strikes consisting of 56 engagements Nov. 13-16, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Officials reported details of the strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Strikes in Syria

Yesterday in Syria, coalition military forces conducted five strikes consisting of 10 engagements against ISIS targets near Dayr Az Zawr. The strikes engaged four ISIS tactical units and destroyed an ISIS vehicle and three explosive hazards.

On Nov. 15, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets near Dayr Az Zawr. The strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit.

On Nov. 14, coalition military forces conducted four strikes consisting of seven engagements against ISIS targets near Dayr Az Zawr. The strikes engaged four ISIS tactical units and destroyed three explosive hazards, two fighting positions and a command-and-control center.

On Nov. 13, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Abu Kamal, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS headquarters.
  • Near Dayr Az Zawr, two strikes engaged two ISIS tactical units and destroyed an ISIS vehicle and an ISIS headquarters.

Strikes in Iraq

Yesterday in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted five strikes consisting of five engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Qayyarah, three strikes destroyed three ISIS-held buildings.
  • Near Rawah, two strikes destroyed an ISIS improvised explosive device facility and an artillery piece.

On Nov. 15, coalition military forces conducted four strikes consisting of seven engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Qayyarah, a strike destroyed a vehicle-borne bomb factory.
  • Near Rawah, three strikes engaged two ISIS tactical units, destroyed four ISIS vehicles and damaged a fighting position.

On Nov. 14, coalition military forces conducted eight strikes consisting of 17 engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Qaim, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed two ISIS vehicles, a weapons cache, a vehicle-borne-bomb factory and two suicide vests.
  • Near Qayyarah, a strike destroyed an ISIS supply route.
  • Near Ramadi, a strike destroyed an ISIS bunker and four ISIS vehicles.
  • Near Rawah, five strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed a vehicle-borne-bomb factory, an ISIS-held building, a weapons cache and an ISIS headquarters and facilitated effective fire on ISIS targets.

On Nov. 13, coalition military forces conducted four strikes consisting of four engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Qaim, a strike destroyed a vehicle-borne-bomb factory.
  • Near Rawah, three strikes destroyed two ISIS tractor-trailers and two vehicle-borne-bomb factories.

Previous Strikes

Additionally, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of one engagement near Qaim, Iraq on Nov. 11. The strike destroyed an ISIS supply route.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

These strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The destruction of ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria also further limits the group’s ability to project terror and conduct external operations throughout the region and the rest of the world, task force officials said.

The list above contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft; rocket-propelled artillery; and some ground-based tactical artillery when fired on planned targets, officials noted.

Ground-based artillery fired in counterfire or in fire support to maneuver roles is not classified as a strike, they added. A strike, as defined by the coalition, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single or cumulative effect.

For example, task force officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined, officials said.

The task force does not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

Coalition Airstrikes Kill 4 Senior ISIS Leaders

Coalition airstrikes killed four senior Islamic State of Iraq and Syria leaders in the past three weeks, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials announced today.

The removal of these key terrorists disrupts ISIS’ weapons engineering activities and their ability to recruit and train terrorists,” officials said in a statement. “It also reduces their ability to plan and conduct terrorist attacks, both within Syria and Iraq and abroad.

Dead are:

  • Yusuf Demir, an ISIS media official with links to ISIS networks throughout the Middle East and Europe, killed Oct. 26 near Qaim, Iraq;
  • Omer Demir, an ISIS external operations coordinator with links to ISIS networks in the Middle East and Europe, also killed Oct. 26 near Qaim;
  • Abu Yazin, an ISIS senior leader and weapons facilitator, killed Nov. 3 near Mayadin, Syria; and
  • Abdellah Hajjiaou, an ISIS external operations plotter, killed Nov. 5 near Abu Kamal, Syria.

The coalition will continue to exert pressure on ISIS senior leaders and associates across multiple networks in order to degrade, disrupt, and dismantle ISIS structures and remove the extremist terrorists throughout Iraq and Syria,” officials said in the statement announcing the deaths.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

Defeat-ISIS Campaign Deprives Enemy of Safe Havens

The U.S.-led coalition to defeat the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria continues to support Syrian Democratic Forces as they pressure ISIS by advancing toward the confluence of the Kabul and Euphrates River valleys, Army Col. Ryan S. Dillon, spokesman for Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve, told reporters today.

More than 1,500 square miles of formerly ISIS-held territory has been liberated since the beginning of operations in September, Dillon said from Baghdad during a teleconference with reporters in the Pentagon.

“The coalition continues supporting our Syrian partners through surveillance and combat advice, as well as more than 40 precision strikes in the past week targeting ISIS fighters, weapons, logistics and command nodes,” Dillon said.

He added, “We will continue to deprive ISIS remnants of their resources in safe havens and continue our defeat-ISIS mission so long as they pose a threat.”

The fielding and training of police and security forces such as the Raqqa Internal Security Force “will grow in importance as ISIS’ conventional force continues to face defeat and reverts to its terrorist roots,” Dillon said.

Supporting Partners

“The coalition will continue to support our partners’ needs for effective forces tailored to meet the needs of the Syrian and Iraqi people,” he added.

As war debris is carefully cleared, residents can begin to return home, the spokesman said. This week with coalition-enabled efforts, nearly 8,000 civilians were returned to their homes in Meshlib, Syria, after the SDF declared the area clear, he added.

Additionally, the inclusive and locally governed Raqqa Civil Council has led the way in public health, safety, economic and educational efforts in the area, with ongoing support from the coalition, Dillon said.

Video: IS has cost Iraq “more than $100bn”

From AFP. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

The Islamic State group’s occupation of northern Iraq and the battle to defeat it has caused more than $100 billion worth of damage, Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi said on Saturday:

Details of Latest Strikes Against ISIS

U.S. and coalition military forces have continued to attack the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, conducting 39 strikes consisting of 67 engagements Nov. 12 through yesterday, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported.

Officials reported details of the most recent strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Strikes in Syria

On Nov. 10 in Syria, coalition military forces conducted eight strikes consisting of nine engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Shadaddi, a strike destroyed an ISIS fighting position.
  • Near Dayr Az Zawr, seven strikes engaged six ISIS tactical units and damaged a heavy machine gun.

On Nov. 11 in Syria, coalition military forces conducted five strikes consisting of five engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Shadaddi, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS vehicle and a fighting position.
  • Near Dayr Az Zawr, four strikes engaged four ISIS tactical units.

Yesterday in Syria, coalition military forces conducted 10 strikes consisting of 18 engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Abu Kamal, two strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS tactical vehicle.
  • Near Shadaddi, a strike destroyed an ISIS fighting position.
  • Near Dayr Az Zawr, seven strikes engaged seven ISIS tactical units and destroyed a heavy machine gun, a fighting position and an ISIS vehicle.

Strikes in Iraq

On Nov. 10 in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted seven strikes consisting of 21 engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Qaim, two strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS-held building and a missile.
  • Near Ramadi, two strikes destroyed four ISIS tunnels, a weapons cache, an ISIS truck, an ISIS sedan and an ISIS fuel truck.
  • Near Rawa, two strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS staging area.
  • Near Tuz, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS tunnel, two weapons caches, an ISIS truck and a tunnel entrance.

On Nov. 11 in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted eight strikes consisting of 13 engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Qaim, three strikes engaged two ISIS tactical units and destroyed an ISIS-held building, an improvised-explosive-device storage facility and five ISIS supply routes.
  • Near Hawija, two strikes destroyed four IEDs.
  • Near Rawa, three strikes suppressed an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS-held building and facilitated effective harassing fire on ISIS targets.

Yesterday in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of one engagement near Rawa, destroying an ISIS fighting position.

Previous Strikes

Officials also provided details today on nine strikes consisting of 20 engagements in Syria and Iraq for which the information was not available in time for the most recent previous report:

  • On Nov. 5 near Abu Kamal, a strike destroyed two ISIS supply routes.
  • On Nov. 5 near Qaim, a strike destroyed four ISIS supply routes.
  • On Nov. 7 near Abu Kamal, a strike destroyed eight ISIS supply routes.
  • On Nov. 7 near Qaim, three strikes destroyed four ISIS supply routes.
  • On Nov. 8 near Abu Kamal, a strike facilitated effective counter fire on ISIS targets.
  • On Nov. 9 near Qaim, two strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS-held building.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

These strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The destruction of ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria also further limits the group’s ability to project terror and conduct external operations throughout the region and the rest of the world, task force officials said.

The list above contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft; rocket-propelled artillery; and some ground-based tactical artillery when fired on planned targets, officials noted.

Ground-based artillery fired in counterfire or in fire support to maneuver roles is not classified as a strike, they added. A strike, as defined by the coalition, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single or cumulative effect.

For example, task force officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined, officials said.

The task force does not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)