ISIS


ISIS holds on the water going to Middle and South of Iraq

BAGHDAD, Iraq: In the official announcement of the Iraqi Prime Minister, Nouri Al-Maliki’s office, it was revealed today, April 6, 2014, that ISIS gunmen blocked all the water sources that runt into the other parts of Iraq. The announcement states that despite of all their brutal actions, ISIS group, well supported by the remainder of Baath members, have blocked water sources flow to the people of middle and south of Iraq against […]

Video: New Media Campaign Targets ISIL

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Iraq’s government has launched a media campaign to accompany its military offensive against the armed group, known as the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL).

It is seen as the most dangerous of all the fighter groups at war with the government, which is trying to create a secure environment for upcoming elections.

Al Jazeera‘s Imran Khan reports from Baghdad:

Video: New Media Campaign Targets ISIL

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Iraq’s government has launched a media campaign to accompany its military offensive against the armed group, known as the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL).

It is seen as the most dangerous of all the fighter groups at war with the government, which is trying to create a secure environment for upcoming elections.

Al Jazeera‘s Imran Khan reports from Baghdad:

ISIS Shifts Tactics In Fallujah

By Mushreq Abbas for Al-Monitor. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Three months after the Islamic State of Iraq and Al-Sham (ISIS) decided to avoid public appearances and maintain a low profile in Fallujah, the group put on a military parade in the center of the city to showcase its strength.

The move signaled the start of an armed conflict to control the city.On March 20, ISIS fighters staged a parade in downtown Fallujah. The parade was similar to previous ones, with convoys of cars carrying the group’s flags.

This time, however, ISIS used Humvees, the type owned by Iraqi government forces and the police. ISIS had seized most of the vehicles after battles with the Iraqi army.The parade appears to have been directed at the official Iraqi forces, which failed to break into the city despite shelling it daily.

Yet, the parade also marks the end of the truce between ISIS and the armed tribes that have sprung up in Fallujah since the beginning of this year.

The armed groups in Fallujah consist primarily of fighters organized under the so-called “military council for the tribes of Fallujah.” These fighters are affiliated with armed groups that are not linked to ISIS, such as the Army of the Naqshbandi Way, Hamas Iraq, Jaish al-Murabitoun, Jaish al-Islami and Katayeb Thwarat al-Ishreen, in addition to Salafist fighters affiliated with the international al-Qaeda organization and not loyal to ISIS.

These Salafist fighters previously fought with Jabhat al-Nusra in Syria. In addition, there are less organized fighters affiliated with the local clans and led by Sheikh Ali Hatem al-Suleiman.

ISIS fighters used to be present amid those overlapping forces, but under the guise of coming to help the local fighters unconditionally. Thus, ISIS avoided colliding with tribal groups and agreed to requests to stop fighting or lead operations.

However, during the past month, the relationship between these parties has changed. Most of the forces in the military council of the tribes were close to accepting a reconciliation with the government to prevent the Iraqi army from entering Fallujah, put an end to the fighting and achieve some Sunni demands.

That reconciliation would have threatened ISIS’ vision, one that does not include reconciliation.

Observers of the events in Fallujah told Al-Monitor that there have always been differences between the fighters inside the city, but those differences were kept under control when the danger of the Iraqi army entering was high, and simmered when the fight with Iraqi forces quieted down.

For this reason, the Iraqi army choosing to put off storming Fallujah, a costly option in terms of human lives, money and morale, thus escalating the power struggle inside Fallujah over the right to determine the outcome of the crisis there.

According to Al-Monitor‘s sources in Fallujah, the tribal elders and military leaders of the factions within the city always knew that ISIS will turn on them the moment it deems appropriate. The recent parade can be seen as the beginning of a coup by ISIS fighters against the tacit agreement that ISIS works within other organizations.

This is a complex issue that cannot be understood without going back to the history of the conflict between al-Qaeda and the factions formed by Salafist jihadists, the Muslim Brotherhood and Baathists.

Starting in 2006, Anbar and other Iraqi areas witnessed fierce clashes between these parties. Many fighters were placed under the auspices of the US military as part of the Sahwa organization, which succeeded in undermining al-Qaeda and killing or capturing most of its leaders before al-Qaeda started its gradual revival in 2009.

The parade by ISIS reveals the start of a fierce internal conflict between the gunmen in Fallujah. Of course, ISIS hopes that its parades will kill two birds with one stone: taking over the decision-making from the tribal elders, clerics and some faction leaders and dragging the Iraqi army into a confrontation, thus forcing the rest of the factions and clans to work under ISIS to defend Fallujah.

The history of ISIS in Iraq shows that wherever it is present, it assassinates its competitors, gets rid of moderate clerics and opponents in various ways and imposes Sharia courts. That phase has not yet started in Fallujah, but the parade suggests that it could begin at any moment.

(Source: Al-Monitor)

Terrorist Trainer Kills Most of Own Class in Bomb Detonation Accident

In a turn of events that can only be described as poetic justice, Long War Journal’s Threat Matrix recently reported that an Islamic State of Iraq and the Sham (ISIS) suicide bomb trainer accidentally killed most of his class during a training mishap. As in, the guy experienced a “premature detonation” of sorts that resulted in the inflamed and timely demise of twenty-two ISIS members and the wounding of fifteen others. That kind of premature detonation. Must’ve been one hell of an attention step!

What probably didn’t help this situation were the large stores of “other explosive devices and heavy weapons” kept at the ISIS camp located in a farming area in the northeastern province of Samara, Iraq. This is karma right here, folks. Either that or the latest contestants auditioning for the coveted Darwin Award.

LWJ reports an Iraqi Army officer as saying that the suicide bomb trainer was a “prolific recruiter who was [for once] ‘able to kill the bad guys.’” One of the most explosive side effects of this fiery situation is the selflessness demonstrated by the ISIS operative, who took it upon himself to facilitate the introduction of his jihad brethren to his combustible knowledge of suicide bombing techniques. The Iraqi Army, for one, is grateful.

But while the latest Darwin Award contestants eliminate themselves through enkindled displays of suicide bomb techniques, further investigation reveals some disturbing trends. For one is the simple fact that ISIS is able to “recruit such a large number of suicide bombers and then train them all in one place.” Holding a massive forum on suicide bombing with thirty-seven of your new best friends and favorite instructor makes for a pretty large venue. Second is the question regarding the number of similar ISIS suicide bombing camps in existence. With any luck, the instructors all attended the same “train the trainer” course and we’ll see repeat events in the near future.

As LWJ identified, ISIS “has enough capacity to even use its own suicide bombers against rival Islamists”, which means that while still a heated event, it probably won’t make much difference to ISIS suicide bomb operations in the long run. But one can hope. Bring back this guy and the issue may solve itself.

Thanks for listening.

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Video: Al-Qaeda Severs Ties with ISIL

From Jewish News One. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Al-Qaeda has severed its links with the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, known as ISIL, a militant group fighting in Syria.

The global terror group’s general commander posted messages on jihadist websites, saying that al-Qaeda does not have any relationship with ISIL and is not responsible for their actions:

US Re-Affirms Partnership with Iraq

On Wednesday, President Obama joined Vice President Joe Biden’s meeting with Iraqi Council of Representatives Speaker Osama al-Nujaifi and a delegation of Iraqi parliamentarians. Both sides reaffirmed the importance of the strategic partnership between the United States and Iraq.

The President encouraged Iraq’s leaders to continue dialogue to address the legitimate grievances of all communities through the political process. Both sides agreed on the need for both security and political measures to combat terrorism, and discussed efforts to formally integrate local and tribal forces into the state security structures consistent with the Government of Iraq’s public commitments in recent days.

President Obama and Vice President Biden also expressed the United States’ strong support for continued cooperation between local and tribal leaders and the Iraqi Government against al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI)/the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL).

The President and Vice President underscored that the United States stands with Iraq and its people in the fight against AQI/ISIL and other extremist groups.

(Source: The White House)

Video: Iraq and the ISIL Explained

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

At the end of 2012, Sunni tribes in Iraq’s Anbar province began a series of protests that lasted throughout 2013.

The initial demand was for the release of Sunni detainees; the detention of female detainees was a major grievance in the male-dominated culture of Anbar:

Resolution of Anbar Crisis Requires Coordination

By Mushreq Abbas for Al-Monitor. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Resolution of Anbar crisis requires security, political coordination

When the Iraqi army marched on the Anbar desert on Dec. 22 to wage war against al-Qaeda fighters along the Iraqi-Syrian border, the operation was viewed as an opportunity to restore the hope of achieving internal consensus around the necessity to fight extremism.

Instead, however, it resurrected a state of confusion, leading to questions about the decisions being made in Baghdad as countless al-Qaeda militants brought the fighting from the border to the streets of the cities in Anbar province following the arrest of Sunni MP Ahmed al-Alwani, the dispersal of yearlong Sunni protests and the resulting rise in tribal anger.

The situation in Anbar was unstable to begin with. These areas had for 10 years been the scene of numerous security disturbances and skirmishes, as residents there continued to be subjected to marginalization and exclusion at the political level.

Al-Qaeda also played a major role in the instability plaguing Sunni cities, contributing to the necessity for military intervention, various conflicts and accusations of collusion burdening the local population. The Sunnis in the affected areas complained that accusations of their belonging to al-Qaeda were used to attack them and target their political figures, clan leaders and social and religious personalities.

It should have come as no surprise when in late December in Anbar hundreds of fighters from the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) flooded into cities to burn security stations and other government sites. During the past 10 years, al-Qaeda has learned to exploit social unrest in Iraq to expand its activities and has used the tense relationship between authorities in Baghdad and the Sunni cities as an avenue for spreading its influence. The roots of the situation in Anbar are many.