Iraq Crisis Response and Resilience Programme (ICRRP)


Study: Niche Markets and Growth Sectors in Northern Iraq

Iraq, and in particular northern Iraq, is rich in agricultural resources. Recent years, however, have seen an over-reliance on the oil sector to drive growth. In 2014, deteriorating security and conflict in Iraq, coupled with a dramatic fall in global oil prices, caused a severe economic recession in the country.

The Government of Iraq and the Kurdistan Regional Government faced severe fiscal crises whilst millions of displaced Iraqis and Syrians depended on humanitarian support.

Through the Iraq Crisis Response and Resilience Programme (ICRRP), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is assisting in both crisis response and economic recovery, and is seeking to promote development by building a resilience framework.

With the security and economic crises affecting millions, livelihoods programmes can help to provide diverse and sustainable employment opportunities to promote economic growth. Agriculture programmes in particular have value-added opportunities to lead this growth. However, structural challenges remain an obstacle.

UNDP’s ICRRP evaluated the performance and potential of promising niche markets to map the value chains, identify activities that can be established or expanded locally and, finally, inform further tailored livelihood interventions to be undertaken within the selected sectors by partners, the private sector, and government bodies.

The analysis of niche markets provides valuable information in terms of the existing gaps, constraints and potential opportunities, including linking with existing initiatives and commercial interests. This will help to boost market performance either by establishing a new activity within the value chain that currently relies on imports, or by supporting and modernizing existing activities. This study has been made possible by the generous support of the Government of Japan.

Highlights

  • Demand for fresh flowers, decorative plants and greening of urban areas has grown, especially in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq
  • Products originating from fruit, such as juice, dried/dehydrated fruits, canned fruits and jams are popular
  • The domestic fresh herb sector is small and fragmented, with the products mainly imported
  • Regarding all three niche markets, production tends to be small-scale, relies on conventional methods, and can be modernized to vastly improve productivity
  • All sectors offer employment potential for targeted populations: internally displaced people, refugees, host community members, youth and women

The full report can be downloaded here.

(Source: UNDP in Iraq)

France Contributes $1m to Resilience in Iraq

France contributes US$980,600 to resilience in Iraq

The Government of France has contributed US$980,600 (€833,500) to UNDP’s Iraq Crisis Response and Resilience Programme (ICRRP) to promote recovery and resilience-building in areas liberated from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL).

Hundreds of thousands of Iraqis fled the ISIL takeover of the Ninewah Plains in 2014. Most have yet to return. Families from these areas, particularly Karemles, Hamdaniya (Qaraqosh), and Bartella, face multiple challenges due to the destruction caused by ISIL, including a lack of job opportunities, the disruption of basic services, and heavily damaged housing.

France’s contribution to ICRRP will help restore livelihoods and facilitate the return of internally displaced people from the Ninewah Plains, including vulnerable minority communities, through housing rehabilitation and the provision of grants to small businesses. The project will be implemented by two non-governmental organizations, L’Oeuvre d’Orient and Fraternite’ en Irak.

UNDP’s Resident Representative for Iraq, Ms. Lise Grande, said:

“These communities have been through so much. France’s contribution comes at just the right time to help families return home safely, voluntarily and in dignity.”

The French Ambassador to Iraq, Mr. Bruno Aubert, said:

“This integrated project will allow these communities to benefit again from basic services, and help them engage in local economic activities that produce income for their families.”

UNDP’s ICRRP provides fast-track support to vulnerable families in newly liberated cities and villages where social tensions threaten community cohesion.

ICRRP is designed as a resilience and recovery programme to help families withstand the multi-dimensional shocks associated with post-liberation and large-scale returns.

(Source: UNDP in Iraq)

France Contributes $1m to Resilience in Iraq

France contributes US$980,600 to resilience in Iraq

The Government of France has contributed US$980,600 (€833,500) to UNDP’s Iraq Crisis Response and Resilience Programme (ICRRP) to promote recovery and resilience-building in areas liberated from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL).

Hundreds of thousands of Iraqis fled the ISIL takeover of the Ninewah Plains in 2014. Most have yet to return. Families from these areas, particularly Karemles, Hamdaniya (Qaraqosh), and Bartella, face multiple challenges due to the destruction caused by ISIL, including a lack of job opportunities, the disruption of basic services, and heavily damaged housing.

France’s contribution to ICRRP will help restore livelihoods and facilitate the return of internally displaced people from the Ninewah Plains, including vulnerable minority communities, through housing rehabilitation and the provision of grants to small businesses. The project will be implemented by two non-governmental organizations, L’Oeuvre d’Orient and Fraternite’ en Irak.

UNDP’s Resident Representative for Iraq, Ms. Lise Grande, said:

“These communities have been through so much. France’s contribution comes at just the right time to help families return home safely, voluntarily and in dignity.”

The French Ambassador to Iraq, Mr. Bruno Aubert, said:

“This integrated project will allow these communities to benefit again from basic services, and help them engage in local economic activities that produce income for their families.”

UNDP’s ICRRP provides fast-track support to vulnerable families in newly liberated cities and villages where social tensions threaten community cohesion.

ICRRP is designed as a resilience and recovery programme to help families withstand the multi-dimensional shocks associated with post-liberation and large-scale returns.

(Source: UNDP in Iraq)

UNDP Improves Access to Safe Water in Sulaimaniyah

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and Sulaimaniyah Governorate completed the rehabilitation of the main water network providing safe drinking water to hundreds of thousands of people.

UNDP’s Iraq Crisis Response and Resilience Programme (ICRRP) and Sulaimaniyah Governorate repaired key components of the main pipeline that transfers water from Dukan Lake to Sulaimaniyah Governorate. Pumping stations and a treatment plant were also rehabilitated to help alleviate water shortages and ensure an adequate supply of clean water to households in the Governorate.

At a ceremony on 5 July 2017 marking the completion of the project, Governor of Sulaimaniyah H.E. Omer Ahmed Amin, said:

“In Sulaimaniyah, one in every eight residents is an internally displaced person. The influx of displaced people is putting considerable pressure on public services, in particular water, electricity, health, and education. This project is providing a key service to all women, men and children in Sulaimaniyah.”

The Head of the Consular Office of Japan in Erbil, Mr. Moriyasu Katsumi, said:

“Japan is honoured to be a partner of this important project. We are delighted to see that all inhabitants of Sulaimaniyah, including internally displaced people and Syrian refugees, will equally benefit from improved access to the water supply.”

UNDP’s Programme Manager for ICRRP, Ms. Mizuho Yokoi, noted:

“Water is essential for life. We are glad we contributed to such an important basic service project focused on improving the well-being of vulnerable communities. We thank the Sulaimaniyah Governorate for their cooperation and the Government of Japan for the generous contribution which made this project possible.”

The first step to recovery, after a crisis, is ensuring people have access to basic services. UNDP’s ICRRP is supporting local authorities to deliver services that are fundamental to daily life. Over 2.4 million people in Iraq have access to improved basic services like water, electricity, health, education, sewerage and roads thanks to UNDP.

(Source: UNDP)

Displaced Iraqi Youth learn Job Skills

With support from UNDP and Toyota Iraq, displaced Iraqi youth learn job skills and regain hope for a better life

More than three million Iraqis are currently displaced as a result of the protracted conflict in Iraq.

The experience of displacement has been particularly difficult for young people, whose education and employment opportunities have been upended. Immediate support is urgently needed to provide these young people with income opportunities to help them restart their lives and rebuild their country.

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and Toyota Iraq joined hands in 2016 to provide young displaced Iraqis with access to sustainable income opportunities. Under this flagship programme, UNDP’s Iraq Crisis Response and Resilience Programme (ICRRP) refers potential candidates to Toyota Iraq. The Toyota Iraq team provides top class vocational and on-the-job training whilst ICRRP facilitates job placement, if Toyota Iraq cannot recruit them, in local companies.

The first group of youth graduated in basic vehicle maintenance in January 2017, whilst the second group graduated in customer relationship management and automotive parts storekeeping in June 2017. A third group will begin in August 2017.

This programme also provides job opportunities for women affected by the crisis in Iraq, enabling them to go beyond their gendered role as caretakers. One of the women trainees, Taghrid Hassan, 29, from Mosul, said:

We thank you for this training; we have benefited so much from it. We have learned how to deal with different clients, and how to respond to their requests by phone and by email in a professional way. I am confident that the new skills I have acquired at Toyota Iraq will increase my chances of finding a job in the customer care field.

UNDP’s Assistant Administrator and Director of the Regional Bureau for Arab States, Mr. Mourad Wahba, visited Sumitomo Corporation, shareholder of Toyota Iraq, in Tokyo on 28 June 2017. He discussed with Mr. Naoki Hidaka, Executive Vice President of Sumitomo Corporation, the partnership between UNDP and Toyota Iraq.

Mr. Wahba said:

“Partnership between UNDP and leading private sector companies, such as Toyota Iraq, can play a key role in enhancing resilience of young people and empowering them as change makers in Iraq. UNDP is proud to work with Toyota Iraq in the implementation of this successful vocational training and job placement programme. It will help displaced Iraqi youth rebuild their lives.”

Mr. Hidaka said:

“Iraq is a special country for us, Sumitomo Corporation. We have been exporting Toyota and Hino products since the 1960s. We would like to contribute to a sound and sustainable development of the Iraqi society through our business activities. We continue to provide more education opportunities to Iraqi people together with UNDP.”

Some of the trainees who have successfully completed the vocational training programme have been recruited by Toyota Iraq, like Omar Hussein Ali, 27, from Ramadi. He said:

“I have a degree in mechanical engineering but had no working experience in this field. This programme helped me gain hands-on experience in vehicle maintenance. I am so glad I found a job at Toyota Iraq. With my steady salary, I can pay off my debts and provide for my twins and my wife.”

UNDP’s ICRRP and Toyota Iraq are committed to continuing this partnership to support Iraqi youth to create a brighter future.

(Source: UNDP)

Japan give additional $16.7m to Stabilization in Iraq

Japan contributes additional US$16.7 million to stabilization and resilience in Iraq

The Government of Japan has contributed an additional US$16.7 million to UNDP’s Funding Facility for Stabilization (FFS) and Iraq Crisis Response and Resilience Programme (ICRRP) to promote stabilization, recovery, and resilience-building in areas liberated from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), and in areas with large displaced populations.

This new funding brings Japan’s total contribution to FFS and ICRRP close to $60 million since 2014.

Based on priorities identified by the Government of Iraq and local authorities, FFS helps quickly repair public infrastructure, provides grants to small businesses, boosts the capacity of local government, promotes civil engagement and community reconciliation, and provides short-term employment through public works schemes.

Japan’s additional contribution to FFS will support the rapid rehabilitation of key infrastructure and provide livelihood support in newly liberated areas, including in Mosul.

Japan’s contribution to ICRRP will support grants to small businesses, employment activities and the rehabilitation of infrastructure and housing in areas with large populations of displaced people as well as in newly liberated areas. Funding for ICRRP will also be used for community reconciliation and peace education amongst different ethnic and religious groups.

Improving Women’s Livelihoods in Ninewah

For a young Yazidi woman who survived upheaval and displacement in northern Iraq, hope and stability finally arrived in an unexpected form: plump brown quails, and their tiny speckled eggs.

Gulistan, 23, lives in the predominantly Christian and Yazidi district of Alqosh in the northern reaches of Ninewah Governorate. In the summer of 2014, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) swept through the city of Mosul and the surrounding Ninewah Plains in a wave that faced little initial resistance.

When ISIL approached Alqosh, Gulistan and her 27-year-old husband Nashwan frantically fled their home along with 14 family members, worried that as members of the Yazidi minority, they would be targeted by ISIL.

From struggle to hope

After months of displacement in the neighbouring Duhok Governorate, they returned to their home, but had trouble rebuilding their lives.

“We were struggling to make ends meet after we returned. We depended on financial support from our relatives. We were going through a terribly difficult time,” recalls Gulistan.

Things changed when Gulistan and her husband found a new way to make ends meet with help from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). Part of UNDP’s Iraq Crisis Response and Resilience Programme (ICRRP), a livelihoods project is assisting nearly 900 households in Ninewah, helping displaced people, returnees, and host community members, earn an income through poultry breeding, bee-keeping, kitchen gardening and fish farming.

UNDP provided Gulistan and Nashwan with 250 quails and trained the couple in quail breeding, with help from the Duhok College of Agriculture, the local NGO Zakho Small Village (ZSV), and generous funding from the Government of Germany.

Quail farming is gaining popularity in Iraq because it requires relatively low investment and maintenance compared to other poultry farming. Quail eggs are known for powerful health benefits.

Empowered and more

Since late 2016, Gulistan and Nashwan have sold 10,000 eggs and 260 birds at local markets and supermarkets. “We now earn around US$250 (300,000 Iraqi dinars) per month,” says Nashwan, as he meticulously inspects the notebook where he and his wife track their earnings.

Japan Funds Clean Water in Baghdad

Over 400,000 people including displaced receive clean water in Baghdad thanks to generous funding from Japan

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Governorate of Baghdad have completed the rehabilitation of the primary water supply infrastructure in Al Nahrawan District, where water shortages and lack of clean water have exposed displaced people and the host community to the risk of waterborne diseases.

Thanks to generous funding from the Government of Japan, over 400,000 people are now receiving safe drinking water, including 30,000 displaced people from Anbar and Diyala Governorates hosted in Al Nabi Younis camp and surrounding villages.

Governor of Baghdad, H.E. Mr. Ali Muhsin Al-Temimi, said:

“We are extremely grateful to UNDP Iraq for its support to implement this significant project which serves the citizens of Al-Nahrawan and surrounding areas. We also highly value the Government of Japan for funding the project.”

Director of Water, Mr. Ra’ad Khairi Abdullah, echoed the Governor’s comments, adding:

“We are so pleased to see the new water pumping system improve water delivery during this difficult time.”

UNDP’s Iraq Crisis Response and Resilience Programme (ICRRP) and the Directorate of Water, Baghdad Governorate, have upgraded the main water treatment plant in Al Nahrawan through the provision and installation of water treatment equipment and pumps. This has significantly contributed not only to increasing supply, but also to improving the quality of water to prevent potential future outbreaks of water-related diseases.

ICRRP’s National Area Coordinator, Mr. Haiz Abdullah, noted:

“At a time when so many families are suffering the consequences of the crisis in Iraq, the biggest burden is shouldered by communities and local governments. We are very pleased that we can support the Governorate of Baghdad to meet the increasing demands of displaced people and host communities for essential basic services. We are confident that hundreds of thousands of people will be able to improve their lives.”

UNDP’s ICRRP provides fast-track support to vulnerable families in newly liberated cities and villages where social tensions threaten community cohesion. ICRRP is currently active in eleven newly liberated communities in Diyala, Salah al-Din and Ninewah Governorates, and is expected to expand to nearly 30 locations in the months ahead.

ICRRP is designed as a resilience and recovery programme to help families withstand the multi-dimensional shocks associated with post-liberation and large-scale returns.

(Source: UNDP)

UNDP Provides Water, Electricity for over 100,000 Refugees

UNDP helps to ensure access to safe water and reliable electricity for over 100,000 people in the Governorate of Erbil

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Governorate of Erbil have signed two agreements to rehabilitate key infrastructure in areas hosting thousands of displaced people, including large numbers who have fled from Mosul.

With generous funding from the German Development Bank (KfW), UNDP’s Iraq Crisis Response and Resilience Programme (ICRRP) and the Governorate of Erbil will rehabilitate and upgrade the main water treatment plant in Rawanduz, where the local population has more than doubled in size with an influx of displaced people, in order to alleviate chronic water shortages and improve health conditions for the local population.

In Debaga sub-district, UNDP and local authorities will rehabilitate the electrical network, improving the supply of electricity to the local population and thousands of displaced people, many of whom are from Mosul. In total, more than 100,000 people will benefit from these two projects.

Governor of Erbil, H.E. Mr. Nawzad Hadi, said:

“We look forward to continuing our partnership with UNDP to strengthen basic service delivery in the Erbil Governorate and address the increasing needs of residents and displaced people, including hundreds of people who fled from Mosul.”

UNDP’s Head of Stabilization and Resilience, Mr. Joe Feeney, said:

“UNDP is pleased to support the Governorate of Erbil as it continues to provide basic services to its community and an ever-growing population of displaced people. At a time when so many families are in acute need and local governments continue to strain already over-burdened resources, we are confident that these projects will help to alleviate some of this demand.”

Consul for Political and Humanitarian Affairs at the German Consulate in Erbil, Dr. Lars-Uwe Kettner, said:

“This integrated approach is a big step forward in order to improve the lives of displaced people and host communities. Water is the basis of our existence and of foremost importance. Without electricity we cannot imagine our lives any more. We are happy to work with such committed and very strong partners who make sure that the support reaches the people in need.”

UNDP’s ICRRP provides fast-track support to vulnerable families in newly liberated cities and villages where social tensions threaten community cohesion. ICRRP is currently active in eleven newly liberated communities in Diyala, Salah al Din and Ninewah Governorates and is expected to expand to nearly 30 locations in the months ahead.

ICRRP is designed as a resilience and recovery programme to help families withstand the multi-dimensional shocks associated with post-liberation and large-scale returns.

(Source: ReliefWeb)

Toyota, UNDP Launch Training and Jobs Programme for IDPs

UNDP and Toyota capacitate displaced Iraqis to join the workforce and contribute to rebuilding the business environment

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and Toyota Iraq launched a flagship job placement and vocational training programme to provide young, displaced Iraqis with access to sustainable income opportunities.

This comes nearly four months after both parties signed an agreement in Erbil, in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

At the launch, Toyota Iraq’s President, Mr. Sardar H. Hasan, said:

The Toyota Way is a standard, ideal, or guiding beacon for the global network of manufacturers, distributors and dealers. One of our basic principles is Respect for People. Wherever we do business, we actively promote and engage in social contribution activities, both individually and with partners, that help strengthen communities and contribute to the enrichment of society.

“This will be one of many Corporate Social Responsibility activities of Toyota Iraq. With our partner UNDP, our aim is to increase vocational training opportunities in auto-industry for IDPs and host communities through our Technician Development Programme.”

First Secretary of the Embassy of Japan in Iraq, Mr. Hirotaka Tezuka, stated:

“I wish that IDPs who lost their houses, workplaces and jobs due to terrorist attacks by ISIL can contribute to rebuilding the local business environment by utilizing the skills and know-how they obtain from this training.”

In turn, UNDP’s ICRRP Programme Manager, Ms. Mizuho Yokoi, said:

“At a time when so many people in Iraq need support from the international community, UNDP is proud to partner with Toyota, in a way which will make a real difference to the lives of these young people. In the long term, I am confident that this partnership will result in opportunities for countless young people to restart their lives in Iraq.”

Ali Homaidi, a 25-year old mechanical engineer escaped violence in Anbar with his family in 2014 and was one of the trainees. He said:

“Today life has opened a window of hope for my family. It is very difficult to find a job without practical experience and we are so grateful for this opportunity.”

UNDP’s ICRRP provides fast-track support to vulnerable families in newly liberated cities and villages where social tensions threaten community cohesion. ICRRP is currently active in eleven newly liberated communities in Diyala, Salah al-Din and Ninewah Governorates and is expected to expand to nearly 30 locations in the months ahead.

ICRRP is designed as a resilience and recovery programme to help families withstand the multi-dimensional shocks associated with post-liberation and large-scale returns.

(Source: UNDP in Iraq)