Daesh


Is Islamic State back in Kirkuk?

By Mahmut Bozarslan for Al Monitor. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

In the last week of December, an armed group ambushed a convoy on the Kirkuk-Hawija road in Iraq, killing seven people. Iraqi security forces couldn’t track the attackers. The identities of those killed were determined quickly: They were Col. Fazil Sebawi of the Iraqi police, his son and five bodyguards.

Shortly afterward, reports of another attack came from south of Kirkuk. Walid Nuri, the leader of the Jiheshad tribe and commander of Hashd al-Ashayer forces southwest of Kirkuk, his wife and son were killed.

Nobody could explain the attacks. After ousting Kurdish forces from Kirkuk, the Iraqi army and Popular Mobilization Units (PMU) had imposed total control over the area and ensured its security. However, the Islamic State (IS) soon claimed responsibility for both attacks.

After seizing Mosul in 2014, IS had turned toward Kirkuk but was repelled by Kurdish forces controlling the town. Yet, possibly because of the region’s oil wealth, IS never gave up on Kirkuk. Although the extremist group couldn’t control the city center, its influence over the province’s southern regions never waned.

Although IS was not active after it left Kirkuk, it resurfaced after the Iraqi army took control of the region. Iraqi forces went after the IS militants, killing 10 of them in two attacks. Six militants were killed, three in Sadiye and three in Beshir villages. Military commander of Kirkuk army operations announced the six killed were the attackers who had staged the two attacks.

But how did IS resurface even after the region came under the total control of the Iraqi army and the PMU? Security sources in the region, who asked not to be identified, said IS has resumed operations south of Kirkuk. They said sleeper cells of the group have been reactivated and are preparing for new operations.

Coalition Trains, Equips Iraqi Border Guard Force

The first group of Iraqi Border Guard Force members graduated today from a 12-day program conducted by members of the Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve in Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

The coalition works by, with and through its Iraqi partners to ensure the lasting defeat of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria and prevent its ability to transit borders, officials said.

Border Guard Training Program

The coalition-enabled training is the first part of an ongoing program to train and equip Iraqi border guards, who will secure Iraq’s borders using new, rapidly deployable, self-contained border guard equipment sets, according to officials.

Enhanced border guard capabilities will improve national security and international commerce and travel, officials said.

“Coalition trainers at Besmayah Training Complex are instructing border guard units in the employment of this new system, which is scheduled for distribution along Iraq’s western border during the coming year,” said Army Col. Brian Ellis, CJTF-OIR director of partner force development. “The training focuses not only on operation of the equipment but also on the tenets of community policing, ethical conduct, human rights, first aid, self-defense and explosive hazard awareness.”

Specialized Equipment

Standardized shipping containers are pre-packaged for efficient transport and setup, and contain essential equipment for border enforcement and security, including two vehicles, defensive barriers, night vision equipment, radios, metal detectors, first aid, checkpoint supplies, a tent and a generator, officials said.

The self-contained border guard equipment program represents a multinational effort, with the U.S. allocating more than $300 million to Iraq’s border security efforts, and with members of Spanish Guardia Civil, or Civil Guard, leading the training, according to officials.

Many other coalition forces will be involved in the delivery of the training and rollout of the program throughout the year, officials said. The Iraqi Border Guard Force will control cross-border movement and prevent the passage of terrorists across borders.

Following the liberation of ISIS-occupied areas in Iraq, the coalition is working with Iraqi security forces “to ensure remnants of the terrorist group cannot resurface or enjoy freedom of movement,” Ellis said.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

Coalition Trains, Equips Iraqi Border Guard Force

The first group of Iraqi Border Guard Force members graduated today from a 12-day program conducted by members of the Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve in Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

The coalition works by, with and through its Iraqi partners to ensure the lasting defeat of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria and prevent its ability to transit borders, officials said.

Border Guard Training Program

The coalition-enabled training is the first part of an ongoing program to train and equip Iraqi border guards, who will secure Iraq’s borders using new, rapidly deployable, self-contained border guard equipment sets, according to officials.

Enhanced border guard capabilities will improve national security and international commerce and travel, officials said.

“Coalition trainers at Besmayah Training Complex are instructing border guard units in the employment of this new system, which is scheduled for distribution along Iraq’s western border during the coming year,” said Army Col. Brian Ellis, CJTF-OIR director of partner force development. “The training focuses not only on operation of the equipment but also on the tenets of community policing, ethical conduct, human rights, first aid, self-defense and explosive hazard awareness.”

Specialized Equipment

Standardized shipping containers are pre-packaged for efficient transport and setup, and contain essential equipment for border enforcement and security, including two vehicles, defensive barriers, night vision equipment, radios, metal detectors, first aid, checkpoint supplies, a tent and a generator, officials said.

The self-contained border guard equipment program represents a multinational effort, with the U.S. allocating more than $300 million to Iraq’s border security efforts, and with members of Spanish Guardia Civil, or Civil Guard, leading the training, according to officials.

Many other coalition forces will be involved in the delivery of the training and rollout of the program throughout the year, officials said. The Iraqi Border Guard Force will control cross-border movement and prevent the passage of terrorists across borders.

Following the liberation of ISIS-occupied areas in Iraq, the coalition is working with Iraqi security forces “to ensure remnants of the terrorist group cannot resurface or enjoy freedom of movement,” Ellis said.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

Military Strikes Continue Against ISIS Terrorists

U.S. and coalition military forces continued to attack the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria between Dec. 18 and yesterday, conducting 11 strikes consisting of 21 engagements, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Officials reported details of the most recent strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Strikes in Syria

Yesterday near Abu Kamal in Syria, coalition military forces conducted a strike engaging an ISIS tactical unit and destroying an ISIS vehicle and an ISIS staging area.

On Dec. 20 near Abu Kamal in Syria, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of 13 engagements against an ISIS tactical unit, destroying two ISIS indirect-fire weapons, two explosive hazards, two maneuver elements and an ISIS headquarters command-and-control center.

On Dec. 19 near Abu Kamal in Syria, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against an ISIS tactical unit, damaging an ISIS supply route and a command-and-control center.

On Dec. 18 near Abu Kamal in Syria, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of two engagements against an ISIS tactical unit, destroying a heavy weapon.

Strikes in Iraq

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on Dec. 21, 2017.

On Dec. 19 near Qaim in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted a strike that destroyed an ISIS tunnel.

On Dec. 18 near Baaj in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of an engagement against an ISIS tactical unit.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

These strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The destruction of ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria also further limits the group’s ability to project terror and conduct external operations throughout the region and the rest of the world, task force officials said.

The list above contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft; rocket-propelled artillery; and some ground-based tactical artillery when fired on planned targets, officials noted.

Ground-based artillery fired in counterfire or in fire support to maneuver roles is not classified as a strike, they added. A strike, as defined by the coalition, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single or cumulative effect.

For example, task force officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined, officials said.

The task force does not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

Details of Latest Strikes Against ISIS in Syria, Iraq

U.S. and coalition military forces continued to attack the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria between Dec. 11-14, conducting 42 strikes consisting of 53 engagements, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Officials reported details of the most recent strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Strikes in Syria

Yesterday in Syria, coalition military forces conducted 10 strikes consisting of 13 engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Abu Kamal, nine strikes engaged six ISIS tactical units and destroyed six ISIS vehicles and a fighting position.
  • Near Tanf, a strike destroyed a weapons cache and two ISIS caves.

On Dec. 13, coalition military forces conducted 14 strikes consisting of 17 engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Abu Kamal, nine strikes engaged nine ISIS tactical units and destroyed three ISIS vehicles and an ISIS headquarters.
  • Near Tanf, five strikes engaged three ISIS tactical units and destroyed three ISIS vehicles, four cave entrances and a tactical vehicle.

On Dec. 12,, coalition military forces conducted seven strikes consisting of seven engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes engaged seven ISIS tactical units and destroyed two ISIS vehicles and a heavy weapon.

On Dec. 11, coalition military forces conducted six strikes consisting of seven engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes engaged five ISiS tactical units and destroyed three ISIS heavy weapons.

Strikes in Iraq

There were no reported strikes in Iraq yesterday.

On Dec. 13 in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Rutbah, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS vehicle.
  • Near Tuz, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed two ISIS tents and a bunker.

On Dec. 12, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Baghdadi, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit.
  • Near Rutbah, a strike destroyed two ISIS-held buildings.

On Dec. 11, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of five engagements against ISIS targets near Hawija. The strike engaged an ISiS tactical unit and destroyed two ISIS meeting facilities.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

These strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The destruction of ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria also further limits the group’s ability to project terror and conduct external operations throughout the region and the rest of the world, task force officials said.

The list above contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft; rocket-propelled artillery; and some ground-based tactical artillery when fired on planned targets, officials noted.

Ground-based artillery fired in counterfire or in fire support to maneuver roles is not classified as a strike, they added. A strike, as defined by the coalition, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single or cumulative effect.

For example, task force officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined, officials said.

The task force does not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

The Islamic State Group Lives On – in Iraq’s Deserts

This article was originally published by Niqash. Any opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

Anbar’s western desert is a hiding place for the Islamic State group, locals say. And they fear the extremists will be back as soon as an opportunity presents itself.

Last week the Iraqi government declared victory over the extremist group known as the Islamic State. But, according to locals and military personnel living in the Anbar province, that declaration was premature.

“I have seen no genuine indications that this province is rid of the Islamic State group,” says Ayad al-Nimrawi, a 43-year-old who runs a restaurant in the Kilo area, about 160 kilometres along the road between Baghdad and the Syrian-Jordanian border. “I still see commercial trucks accompanied by security details when they come along here. Even the security forces cannot travel down here alone, they require extra protection.”

“I will only feel that we have won the final victory when I see life returning to this road as it was before the Islamic State came. We used to travel here at night without any fear of armed groups but today this international road is almost completely closed. As soon as dusk falls, this road is a death trap.”

The victory celebrations were not about the complete eradication of the IS group, rather they were meant to be a signal about the end of military operations, suggests Tariq Yusef al-Asal, a police chief and one of the leaders of Anbar’s tribal militias fighting the Islamic State. “We have the right to be proud of the victories achieved by our security forces in the fighting that’s gone on over three years,” he told NIQASH. “We have sovereignty over our land again.”

However, he adds, “it would be stupid to say that Iraq is now completely clean of extremist groups like the Islamic State. There are still sleeper cells and incubators inside and outside our cities.”

“No country – not even European nations – can claim they are completely clean of Islamic State members,” he continued. “Those sleeper cells will keep the organisation alive and sustain it. These groups make good use of any security vacuum in any country to try and achieve their aims.”

Inherent Resolve Strikes Target ISIS in Syria, Iraq

U.S. and coalition military forces continued to attack the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria over the last three days, conducting 14 strikes consisting of 27 engagements, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported yesterday.

Officials reported details of the most recent strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Strikes in Syria

On Dec. 8 in Syria, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed a tactical vehicle and a fighting position.

On Dec. 9 in Syria, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of five engagements against ISIS targets:

  • Near Abu Kamal, two strikes engaged two ISIS tactical units and destroyed an ISIS vehicle and an ISIS line of communication.
  • Near Shadaddi, a strike engaged an ISIS mortar team.

On Dec. 10 in Syria, coalition military forces conducted eight strikes consisting of 13 engagements against ISIS targets near Abu Kamal. The strikes engaged eight ISIS tactical units and destroyed two fighting positions, a mortar system, a tactical vehicle and an ISIS headquarters.

Strike in Iraq

On Dec. 9 in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of six engagements against ISIS targets near Tuz. The strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS truck.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

These strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. The destruction of ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria also further limits the group’s ability to project terror and conduct external operations throughout the region and the rest of the world, task force officials said.

The list above contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft; rocket-propelled artillery; and some ground-based tactical artillery when fired on planned targets, officials noted.

Ground-based artillery fired in counterfire or in fire support to maneuver roles is not classified as a strike, they added. A strike, as defined by the coalition, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single or cumulative effect.

For example, task force officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined, officials said.

The task force does not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)

PM announces Defeat of Daesh

By John Lee.

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi has declared “the ending of entire clearance of the Aljazeera in Nineveh and Anbar completely, and we have full control along the Iraqi-Syrian … Border.

Al-Abadi has said that the victories were achieved by unity and determination. “The enemy wanted to destroy our country and civilization and we have countered and defeated it.

The Special Representative of the Secretary-General (SRSG) for Iraq, Mr. Ján Kubiš, congratulated Iraq on the complete liberation of all of its territory from the Daesh terrorists:

“On this day, we remember all those who paid the ultimate price. Our thoughts are with the families of the martyrs and fighters from all around the country that stepped forward to save their country, and with the millions who have been displaced and are eagerly waiting to return to their homes to rebuild their lives.”

(Sources: Office of the Iraqi Prime Minister, UN)

PM announces Defeat of Daesh

By John Lee.

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi has declared “the ending of entire clearance of the Aljazeera in Nineveh and Anbar completely, and we have full control along the Iraqi-Syrian … Border.

Al-Abadi has said that the victories were achieved by unity and determination. “The enemy wanted to destroy our country and civilization and we have countered and defeated it.

The Special Representative of the Secretary-General (SRSG) for Iraq, Mr. Ján Kubiš, congratulated Iraq on the complete liberation of all of its territory from the Daesh terrorists:

“On this day, we remember all those who paid the ultimate price. Our thoughts are with the families of the martyrs and fighters from all around the country that stepped forward to save their country, and with the millions who have been displaced and are eagerly waiting to return to their homes to rebuild their lives.”

(Sources: Office of the Iraqi Prime Minister, UN)

Video: Has ISIL been Defeated in Iraq?

From Al Jazeera. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Iraq Business News.

In 2014, ISIL announced it was taking over nearly all of Iraq and Syria.

But three years later and billions lost, Iraq’s Prime Minister Haider Al Abadi says his military has defeated the armed group.

It’s been a long road to get to this point. The battle for Mosul alone took months. Almost a million people had to flee, and thousands left behind were killed.

More than eight thousand homes were reportedly destroyed. And that was just one of several Iraqi cities once controlled by ISIL.

What does this mean for Iraq’s future?

Presenter:

  • Sami Zeidan

Guests:

  • Ali Al Dabbagh – Former Spokesman for the Iraqi Government
  • Tallha Abdulrazaq – Researcher at the University of Exeter’s Strategy and Security Institute
  • Ahmed Rushdi – Adviser to the Speaker of the Iraqi Parliament