Kaperoni: “there are more than 10 articles talking about floating the Iraq dinar” , 19 JUNE

Michael Kaperoni‏ @kaperoni 1h1 hour ago
Over the last couple of years there are more than 10 articles talking about floating the Iraq dinar. There is only one article that talks about the timing is not right to float the Iraqi dinar. My money is on the directives from the IMF, Iraq will float it is the only option.
Michael Kaperoni‏ @kaperoni 1h1 hour ago
By definition moving to a more

Whitelions: “there will BE NO FLOAT” , 19 JUNE

Question:  “How are you going to control inflation when large sums of money come into a country if you’re not going to float your currency?”  [reference Guru Kaperoni post 6-19-18]   In answer to [Guru] Kaperoni… According to the C.B.I People that have Dinar all over the world will bring it to there local banks and exchange it to their countrys currency ( they have 2 years to turn it in ). 

Restored Republic via a GCR as of June 19 2018

Compiled 19 June 12:01 am EST by Judy Byington

The below is a summary of information from the Internet. It would be up to the individual reader to decide whether or not it was valid.

A. June 18 2018 TNT Call

1.The Iraqi court will rule Thurs. on the election. The RV could happen by Thurs. June 21. If not, it would have to happen by July 1 when the new government comes in.

2. The ATMs in Iraq

KTFA UPDATE, 19 JUNE

Monday Night KTFA CC 6-18-18The first part is business Promo and the second part is Dinar/Iraq IntelPLAYBACK # : 641.715.3639 PIN: 156996#https://fccdl.in/DKu5mixakOStephenMac63:  Cmon Small Notes….just as soon as you appear, its not done….its over. The individual value of the small note will explain the potential collective value for the big notes we hold.    IMO, of course  (wink)
***

REPOST: “Tier 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5” by Carden – 19 JUNE

Originally posted on April 6, 2018″Tier 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5″ by Carden – 4.6.18Entry Submitted by Carden at 4:24 PM EDT on April 6, 2018Anybody wonder how these tiers break down? I’ve asked a few pundits and putting what I have learned together with what I know to be true I came up with a working hypothesis.Tier 1 is global authorities: US Treasury, European Union, Monarchy (Sovereign “Very Old

Baghdad Entrepreneurs get Communal Space and Resources

By Alexander Southworth, Iraq Britain Business Council (IBBC).

IBBC Long Read: The Station – Iraq’s the first combined workspace in Iraq, providing tech and artistic entrepreneurs with a communal space and resources to develop and expand business projects.

The Iraq Britain Business Council (IBBC) recently completed a mission to Baghdad, where Christophe Michels, Managing Director and Eng. Rasmi Al-Jabri Deputy Chairman, visited The Station, Iraq’s first combined workspace in Iraq, providing a hub for artistic & tech entrepreneurs to develop and expand business projects.

Located in Baghdad, The Station’s vision is to create a healthy work environment by providing entrepreneurs with experiences to develop and expand their projects. The institution aims to facilitate this entrepreneurial spirit by providing the space, support and resources to help build and develop ideas and implement them on the ground in a society which is heavily weighted towards public sector activity.

While Iraq is a middle-income country, it faces significant challenges more commonly found in low income nations. Such as a dependence on a primary commodity (crude oil), which generates 95 percent of its budget* while only employing 1 percent of the available labour force and a heavily weighted public sector, which accounts for around 60% of employment, with the government providing 40% of jobs.

This is why The Station is such an exciting initiative, it is a boost to a small but growing number of young Iraqis willing to engage and develop the private sector in Iraq. Iraq has one of the most youthful demographics in the world, with nearly half its population being less than 21 years of age.

Young Iraqis, faced either with closed avenues to public sector employment or who do not wish to conform to a status quo which does not reward entrepreneurial spirit, can find at The Station an environment which does just the opposite, facilitating a hub of ideas and resources beneficial to inspiring entrepreneurs.

Inspiration behind the Idea

The founders visited various innovative hubs/co-working spaces around the Middle East and were inspired by the activities and the economic/social impact they were having in those specific communities. They sought to replicate these spaces, but in a way that is relevant to Iraq. The co-founders are entrepreneurs themselves, and they understand the obstacles faced by entrepreneurs and small businesses. Therefore, they decided to create a space with all the facilities they believe are needed to help such an environment thrive. The idea of The Station was not merely to create a physical space but a cultural one.

Haider Hamzoz Media Director at the Station explained that: “Young people in Iraq as a whole aspire to work in the public sector upon graduation, because there have been no viable options other than that. It is not recommended to take huge risks such as investing in a business venture (unless it is a restaurant or barber shop) because there is no track record of such activities in Iraq – at least not in the last two decades. However, start-ups require risk-taking and we want to build a community of risk takers and innovators.”

Funding & Support

The Station was founded by Mujahed al-Waisi, Muhanned Munjed and Ali Tarik. The Station has received funds from The Al-Handhal International Group and is supported by the Iraqi Private Banks League, Earthlink and the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Baghdad.

Future Direction

The Station is working towards starting an incubator program, to empower the ecosystem in Iraq. It also aims to establish and/or partner with venture capitals to fund and invest in startups, businesses and entrepreneurs. The Station also wants to be a driving force in policy advocacy through international agencies and diplomatic entities to empower the Iraqi private sector, and the role of the youth within this sector.

The Station is currently establishing its own Research and Development Centre that will offer a myriad of services, such as mentorship and policy advocacy. Activities will revolve around engaging the youth in discussions and research, not only with the private sector but with the public sector itself, essentially bridging the gap between the government and its citizens, and this is a development that ought to be celebrated because it will empower not only the Iraqi economy but its democratic institution. The Station is seeking to expand to Mosul in the next two years and has plans to develop a Station in the South and on the other side (Al-Karkh) of Baghdad. This hugely positive development

Haider Hamzoz Media Director at the Station says: “With the erosion of ISIS, the youth are in need of a healthy environment more than ever to feed their self-development and we are building a foundation that will allow them to become world-thinkers, innovators and successful role-models for the new generation to come.”

For more information please visit: http://the-station.iq/ or contact info@the-station.iq

*Source: UNIraq  http://www.uniraq.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&layout=item&id=941&Itemid=472&lang=en

(Source: IBBC)

Baghdad Entrepreneurs get Communal Space and Resources

By Alexander Southworth, Iraq Britain Business Council (IBBC).

IBBC Long Read: The Station – Iraq’s the first combined workspace in Iraq, providing tech and artistic entrepreneurs with a communal space and resources to develop and expand business projects.

The Iraq Britain Business Council (IBBC) recently completed a mission to Baghdad, where Christophe Michels, Managing Director and Eng. Rasmi Al-Jabri Deputy Chairman, visited The Station, Iraq’s first combined workspace in Iraq, providing a hub for artistic & tech entrepreneurs to develop and expand business projects.

Located in Baghdad, The Station’s vision is to create a healthy work environment by providing entrepreneurs with experiences to develop and expand their projects. The institution aims to facilitate this entrepreneurial spirit by providing the space, support and resources to help build and develop ideas and implement them on the ground in a society which is heavily weighted towards public sector activity.

While Iraq is a middle-income country, it faces significant challenges more commonly found in low income nations. Such as a dependence on a primary commodity (crude oil), which generates 95 percent of its budget* while only employing 1 percent of the available labour force and a heavily weighted public sector, which accounts for around 60% of employment, with the government providing 40% of jobs.

This is why The Station is such an exciting initiative, it is a boost to a small but growing number of young Iraqis willing to engage and develop the private sector in Iraq. Iraq has one of the most youthful demographics in the world, with nearly half its population being less than 21 years of age.

Young Iraqis, faced either with closed avenues to public sector employment or who do not wish to conform to a status quo which does not reward entrepreneurial spirit, can find at The Station an environment which does just the opposite, facilitating a hub of ideas and resources beneficial to inspiring entrepreneurs.

Inspiration behind the Idea

The founders visited various innovative hubs/co-working spaces around the Middle East and were inspired by the activities and the economic/social impact they were having in those specific communities. They sought to replicate these spaces, but in a way that is relevant to Iraq. The co-founders are entrepreneurs themselves, and they understand the obstacles faced by entrepreneurs and small businesses. Therefore, they decided to create a space with all the facilities they believe are needed to help such an environment thrive. The idea of The Station was not merely to create a physical space but a cultural one.

Haider Hamzoz Media Director at the Station explained that: “Young people in Iraq as a whole aspire to work in the public sector upon graduation, because there have been no viable options other than that. It is not recommended to take huge risks such as investing in a business venture (unless it is a restaurant or barber shop) because there is no track record of such activities in Iraq – at least not in the last two decades. However, start-ups require risk-taking and we want to build a community of risk takers and innovators.”

Funding & Support

The Station was founded by Mujahed al-Waisi, Muhanned Munjed and Ali Tarik. The Station has received funds from The Al-Handhal International Group and is supported by the Iraqi Private Banks League, Earthlink and the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Baghdad.

Future Direction

The Station is working towards starting an incubator program, to empower the ecosystem in Iraq. It also aims to establish and/or partner with venture capitals to fund and invest in startups, businesses and entrepreneurs. The Station also wants to be a driving force in policy advocacy through international agencies and diplomatic entities to empower the Iraqi private sector, and the role of the youth within this sector.

The Station is currently establishing its own Research and Development Centre that will offer a myriad of services, such as mentorship and policy advocacy. Activities will revolve around engaging the youth in discussions and research, not only with the private sector but with the public sector itself, essentially bridging the gap between the government and its citizens, and this is a development that ought to be celebrated because it will empower not only the Iraqi economy but its democratic institution. The Station is seeking to expand to Mosul in the next two years and has plans to develop a Station in the South and on the other side (Al-Karkh) of Baghdad. This hugely positive development

Haider Hamzoz Media Director at the Station says: “With the erosion of ISIS, the youth are in need of a healthy environment more than ever to feed their self-development and we are building a foundation that will allow them to become world-thinkers, innovators and successful role-models for the new generation to come.”

For more information please visit: http://the-station.iq/ or contact info@the-station.iq

*Source: UNIraq  http://www.uniraq.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&layout=item&id=941&Itemid=472&lang=en

(Source: IBBC)

New Airline Launched in Iraqi Kurdistan

By John Lee.

Fly Erbil, Iraq’s only Kurdish airline, successfully completed its first scheduled flight on Monday.

The plane set off from Erbil International Airport en route to Stockholm in Sweden.

The airline’s administrative director Ahmad Jamal told AFP that Fly Erbil currently has three planes and plans to increase to 10 in the future.

Other destination served include Gothenburg (Sweden), Amsterdam (Netherlands), Birmingham (UK), Kiev (Ukraine) and Nuremberg (Germany).

(Sources: AFP, Fly Erbil)

New Airline Launched in Iraqi Kurdistan

By John Lee.

Fly Erbil, Iraq’s only Kurdish airline, successfully completed its first scheduled flight on Monday.

The plane set off from Erbil International Airport en route to Stockholm in Sweden.

The airline’s administrative director Ahmad Jamal told AFP that Fly Erbil currently has three planes and plans to increase to 10 in the future.

Other destination served include Gothenburg (Sweden), Amsterdam (Netherlands), Birmingham (UK), Kiev (Ukraine) and Nuremberg (Germany).

(Sources: AFP, Fly Erbil)

Operation Roundup Hits ISIS Remnants in Iraq, Syria

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve and its partners have increased offensive activity against Islamic State of Iraq and Syria targets in designated parts of Iraq and Syria throughout the months of May and June.

Since the May 1 start of Operation Roundup, Syrian Democratic Forces resumed major offensive operations in the Middle Euphrates River Valley. Since then, the SDF has continued to gain ground through offensive operations coupled with precision coalition strike support.

Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve and its partner forces continue to exert pressure on ISIS senior leaders and associates in order to degrade, disrupt and dismantle ISIS structures and remove terrorists throughout Iraq and Syria. ISIS morale is sinking on the frontlines as privileged ISIS leaders increasingly abandon their own fighters on the battlefield, taking resources with them as they flee.

Over the coming weeks, Operation Roundup will continue to build momentum against ISIS remnants remaining in the Iraq-Syria border region and the middle Euphrates River Valley. The coalition remains committed to the lasting defeat of ISIS here, increasing peace and stability in the region and protecting all our homelands from the ISIS threat.

Coalition military forces conducted 26 strikes June 11-17, consisting of 36 engagements in Iraq and Syria.

Strikes in Syria

On June 17 near Shadaddi, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets, destroying two ISIS fighting positions.

On June 16 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets, destroying two ISIS supply routes.

On June 15, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed an ISIS vehicle. Near Shadaddi, two strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit, destroying an ISIS vehicle and an ISIS anti-air artillery system.

On June 14, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, a strike destroyed an ISIS-held building. Near Shadaddi, a strike destroyed an ISIS logistics hub and an ISIS fighting position.

On June 13, coalition military forces conducted seven strikes consisting of seven engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, four strikes destroyed two ISIS vehicles, an ISIS supply route and damaged an ISIS vehicle. Near Shadaddi, three strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit, destroying an ISIS tactical vehicle, an ISIS line of communication and an ISIS headquarters.

On June 12, coalition military forces conducted four strikes consisting of 10 engagements against ISIS targets. Near Abu Kamal, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit. Near Shadaddi, three strikes engaged an ISIS tactical unit, destroying two ISIS fighting positions and three ISIS lines of communication.

On June 11 near Abu Kamal, coalition military forces conducted three strikes consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets, destroying three ISIS supply routes.

Strikes in Iraq

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on June 15-17.

On June 14, coalition military forces conducted two strikes consisting of four engagements against ISIS targets. Near Basheer, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit and destroyed seven ISIS-held buildings. Near Rutbah, a strike engaged an ISIS tactical unit.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on June 13.

On June 12 near Basheer, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of two engagements against ISIS targets, destroying two ISIS tunnels and an ISIS supply cache.

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on June 11.

Definition of Strikes

This coalition strike release contains all strikes conducted by fighter, attack, bomber, rotary-wing or remotely piloted aircraft, rocket-propelled artillery and ground-based tactical artillery.

A strike, as defined by coalition officials, refers to one or more kinetic engagements that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single, sometimes cumulative effect in that location. For example, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIS vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against a group of ISIS-held buildings and weapon systems in a compound, having the cumulative effect of making that facility harder or impossible to use. Strike assessments are based on initial reports and may be refined.

Task force officials do not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target.

(Source: US Dept of Defense)